Agenda

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Day 1 – Monday 11th June

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08:40
08:50
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Day 1: IMPACT
Day 1: IMPACT
Welcome
Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Richard Muirhead, Founder, Fabric Ventures
Dan Murray, Co Founder of Mobula & Grabble, and Host of the Secret Leaders Podcast
08:30 – 08:50

Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Richard Muirhead, Founder, Fabric Ventures
Dan Murray, Co Founder of Mobula & Grabble, and Host of the Secret Leaders Podcast
08:30 – 08:50

Why AI Matters To Us All
Baroness Joanna Shields, CEO, BenevolentAI
08:50 – 09:10

Baroness Joanna Shields, CEO, BenevolentAI
08:50 – 09:10

Rajeev Misra, CEO, SoftBank Investment Advisers
in conversation with John Ridding, Group CEO, Financial Times
09:10 – 09:30

in conversation with John Ridding, Group CEO, Financial Times
09:10 – 09:30

Professor Juergen Schmidhuber
Director & Professor, The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA – USI & SUPSI
09:30 – 09:50

Director & Professor, The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA – USI & SUPSI
09:30 – 09:50

Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
in conversation with Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
9:50 – 10:10

in conversation with Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
9:50 – 10:10

State of AI
Hosted by Charlie Muirhead, CEO & Founder, CognitionX
Juergen Schmidhuber, Director & Professor, The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA – USI & SUPSI
Antoine Blondeau, Co-Founder, Sentient Technologies and Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Alpha Intelligence Capital
Vishal Chatrath, CEO & Co-Founder, PROWLER.io
Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
10:10 – 10:50

Hosted by Charlie Muirhead, CEO & Founder, CognitionX
Juergen Schmidhuber, Director & Professor, The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA – USI & SUPSI
Antoine Blondeau, Co-Founder, Sentient Technologies and Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Alpha Intelligence Capital
Vishal Chatrath, CEO & Co-Founder, PROWLER.io
Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
10:10 – 10:50

CEO Perspective
Karim Jalbout, Partner, Egon Zehnder in conversation with Moya Greene, CEO, Royal Mail
10:50 – 11:20

Karim Jalbout, Partner, Egon Zehnder in conversation with Moya Greene, CEO, Royal Mail
10:50 – 11:20

Human + Machine
Paul Daugherty, CTO, Accenture
followed by Q&A with Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
11:20 – 11:40

Paul Daugherty, CTO, Accenture
followed by Q&A with Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
11:20 – 11:40

The Economic Singularity
Calum Chace, Author of “The Two Singularities”
11:40 – 11:50

Calum Chace, Author of “The Two Singularities”
11:40 – 11:50

The Digital Ape, How to Live (in Peace) With Smart Machines
Sir Nigel Shadbolt FRS FREng, Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, and Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford

followed by Q&A with Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
11:50 – 12:10

Sir Nigel Shadbolt FRS FREng, Principal of Jesus College, Oxford, and Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford

followed by Q&A with Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
11:50 – 12:10

How AI will Impact on Business
Professor Joshua Gans, Author “Prediction Machines”, Professor of Strategic Management at University of Toronto
12:10 – 12:30

Recent developments in AI are all (and only) about decreasing the cost of prediction. Better, faster and cheaper prediction will increase the use of predictions (in reducing uncertainty) throughout the economy and spur new applications as prediction problems. For businesses, this will transform workflows and, as prediction machines become even better, force changes in business strategy. It is there that they will have disruption potential.

Professor Joshua Gans, Author “Prediction Machines”, Professor of Strategic Management at University of Toronto
12:10 – 12:30

Recent developments in AI are all (and only) about decreasing the cost of prediction. Better, faster and cheaper prediction will increase the use of predictions (in reducing uncertainty) throughout the economy and spur new applications as prediction problems. For businesses, this will transform workflows and, as prediction machines become even better, force changes in business strategy. It is there that they will have disruption potential.

What Does AI Mean For The Economy?
Panel hosted by Laura Noonan, Investment Banking Correspondent, Financial Times
Professor Joshua Gans, Author “Prediction Machines”, Professor of Strategic Management at University of Toronto
JP Rangaswami, CDO, Deutsche Bank
Dr. Karen Croxson, Head of Research & Deputy Chief Economist, Financial Conduct Authority
12:30 – 13:10

Panel hosted by Laura Noonan, Investment Banking Correspondent, Financial Times
Professor Joshua Gans, Author “Prediction Machines”, Professor of Strategic Management at University of Toronto
JP Rangaswami, CDO, Deutsche Bank
Dr. Karen Croxson, Head of Research & Deputy Chief Economist, Financial Conduct Authority
12:30 – 13:10

LUNCH
13:10 – 13:30

13:10 – 13:30

Intelligent Agents and a New Class of Perceived Errors
Dennis Mortensen, CEO and Co-Founder, X.ai
13:30 – 13:50

As we move to the conversational UI and take advantage of NLP and AI in general, we change the way we interact with technology dramatically. The standard GUI is many times fully eliminated, leading to novel challenges in UX. Tasks are removed from the user’s oversight with invisible or seamless software, and the output is not always as expected. But sometimes that output is correct within the parameters given and simply perceived as an error.

Dennis Mortensen, CEO and Co-Founder, X.ai
13:30 – 13:50

As we move to the conversational UI and take advantage of NLP and AI in general, we change the way we interact with technology dramatically. The standard GUI is many times fully eliminated, leading to novel challenges in UX. Tasks are removed from the user’s oversight with invisible or seamless software, and the output is not always as expected. But sometimes that output is correct within the parameters given and simply perceived as an error.

Can AI be Creative?
Panel hosted by Dr. Sarah Dillon Senior Research Fellow, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
Dennis Mortensen CEO and Co-Founder, X.ai
David Hanson CEO and Founder, Hanson Robotics
Professor Maggie Boden OBE, Research Professor of Cognitive Science, Department of Informatics, University of Sussex
13:50 – 14:30

In Isaac Asimov’s 1976 story “The Bicentennial Man”, robot NDR (Andrew) astonishes his owner with his anomalous creativity, producing remarkably beautiful wood carvings. In Neill Blomkamp’s 2015 film CHAPPiE, the embodied AI’s maturation involves learning to paint. If these stories are to be believed, creativity is what defines us as human and, if it shows signs of it, what marks AI as more than machine. But can AI actually be creative, or can it only appear to be so? Either way, why might we want AI to be creative? What impacts does or could this have, from the technological to the philosophical? And, perhaps we should start with this question, what is this thing called “creativity” anyway? This panel gathers together top AI experts to interrogate these questions and explore the past, present and possible futures of AI “creativity”.

Panel hosted by Dr. Sarah Dillon Senior Research Fellow, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
Dennis Mortensen CEO and Co-Founder, X.ai
David Hanson CEO and Founder, Hanson Robotics
Professor Maggie Boden OBE, Research Professor of Cognitive Science, Department of Informatics, University of Sussex
13:50 – 14:30

In Isaac Asimov’s 1976 story “The Bicentennial Man”, robot NDR (Andrew) astonishes his owner with his anomalous creativity, producing remarkably beautiful wood carvings. In Neill Blomkamp’s 2015 film CHAPPiE, the embodied AI’s maturation involves learning to paint. If these stories are to be believed, creativity is what defines us as human and, if it shows signs of it, what marks AI as more than machine. But can AI actually be creative, or can it only appear to be so? Either way, why might we want AI to be creative? What impacts does or could this have, from the technological to the philosophical? And, perhaps we should start with this question, what is this thing called “creativity” anyway? This panel gathers together top AI experts to interrogate these questions and explore the past, present and possible futures of AI “creativity”.

The Future of Online Identity and Privacy in the AI Era
Hosted by Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Dame Wendy Hall, Regius Professor of Computer Science, Pro Vice-Chancellor (International Engagement), University of Southampton and Executive Director, Web Science
Dr Jeni Tennison, CEO The Open Data Institute
Dr Julia Shaw, Memory Scientist, Co-Founder, Spot
Ryan Shea, Co-Founder, Blockstack
14:30 – 15:10

Hosted by Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Dame Wendy Hall, Regius Professor of Computer Science, Pro Vice-Chancellor (International Engagement), University of Southampton and Executive Director, Web Science
Dr Jeni Tennison, CEO The Open Data Institute
Dr Julia Shaw, Memory Scientist, Co-Founder, Spot
Ryan Shea, Co-Founder, Blockstack
14:30 – 15:10

Kay Firth-Butterfield
Head, AI & Machine Learning, World Economic Forum
15:10 – 15:30

Head, AI & Machine Learning, World Economic Forum
15:10 – 15:30

Rule Breaker. Odds Beater. Berlin Wall Basher. The Life and Times of Europe's Most Radical Tech Entrepreneur
Stefan Roever, Co-Founder, AIKON, (previously Founder of Genia) in conversation with Dr Jack Kreindler, Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
15:30 – 15:50

Stefan Roever, Co-Founder, AIKON, (previously Founder of Genia) in conversation with Dr Jack Kreindler, Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
15:30 – 15:50

Could AI Cure Cancer?
Hosted by Dr Jack Kriendler Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Stefan Roever, Co-Founder AIKON, (previously Founder of Genia)
Dr Hugh Harvey, Clinical Lead, Kheiron Medical
Professor Joanna Holbrook, Director Translational Biology, BenevolentAI
Fiona Nielsen, Founder and CEO, Repositive.io
15:50 – 16:30

Hosted by Dr Jack Kriendler Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Stefan Roever, Co-Founder AIKON, (previously Founder of Genia)
Dr Hugh Harvey, Clinical Lead, Kheiron Medical
Professor Joanna Holbrook, Director Translational Biology, BenevolentAI
Fiona Nielsen, Founder and CEO, Repositive.io
15:50 – 16:30

Panel: Is Artificially Extending Life Intelligent?
Hosted by Dr Jack Kriendler Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Maxine Mackintosh , PhD & Co-Founder, UCL & One HealthTech
Polina Mamoshina , Fellow, University of Oxford, Insilico Medicine
Dr Gregory Bailey , CEO, Juvenescence AI
Matt Eagles , Head of Patient Engagement, Havas Lynx
16:30 – 17:10

Hosted by Dr Jack Kriendler Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Maxine Mackintosh , PhD & Co-Founder, UCL & One HealthTech
Polina Mamoshina , Fellow, University of Oxford, Insilico Medicine
Dr Gregory Bailey , CEO, Juvenescence AI
Matt Eagles , Head of Patient Engagement, Havas Lynx
16:30 – 17:10

All change – What AI Changes, and What it Doesn’t
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
17:10 – 17:20

Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
17:10 – 17:20

Closing Remarks
Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
17:20 – 17:30

Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
17:20 – 17:30

Day 1: CUTTING EDGE
Day 1: CUTTING EDGE
Introduction to the Day
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
09:00 – 09:10

Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
09:00 – 09:10

Simulcast: Impact Stage
09:10 – 09:30

09:10 – 09:30

Simulcast: Impact Stage
09:30 – 09:50

09:30 – 09:50

Machine Learning as an AI Toolkit
Danny Lange, VP of AI/ML, Unity
09:50 – 10:10

Danny Lange, VP of AI/ML, Unity
09:50 – 10:10

Frontiers of AI Research
Adrian Weller, Programme Director, The Alan Turing Institute
10:10 – 10:30

Adrian Weller, Programme Director, The Alan Turing Institute
10:10 – 10:30

Beyond Algorithms: Panel Discussion
Hosted by Libby Kinsey, Head of Technology and Lead Technologist for AI and ML, Digital Catapult
Jack Clark, Strategy and Communications Director, OpenAI
Danny Lange, VP of AI/ML, Unity
Adrian Weller, Programme Director for AI, The Alan Turing Institute
10:30 – 11:00

Hosted by Libby Kinsey, Head of Technology and Lead Technologist for AI and ML, Digital Catapult
Jack Clark, Strategy and Communications Director, OpenAI
Danny Lange, VP of AI/ML, Unity
Adrian Weller, Programme Director for AI, The Alan Turing Institute
10:30 – 11:00

Trends in AI Systems
Casimir Wierzynski, Senior Director, AI Product Group, Intel
11:00 – 11:20

Casimir Wierzynski, Senior Director, AI Product Group, Intel
11:00 – 11:20

Accelerating Next Gen Machine Intelligence with IPUs
Simon Knowles, Co-Founder and CTO, Graphcore
11:20 – 11:40

Simon Knowles, Co-Founder and CTO, Graphcore
11:20 – 11:40

Optical Computing Leading the AI Scale-Up
Igor Carron, CEO, LightOn
11:40 – 11:50

Igor Carron, CEO, LightOn
11:40 – 11:50

Future of Hardware for AI
James Wang, Analyst, ArkInvest
11:50 – 12:05

James Wang, Analyst, ArkInvest
11:50 – 12:05

Future of Hardware Panel
Panel hosted by Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
Casimir Wierzynski, Senior Director, AI Product Group, Intel
Simon Knowles, Co-Founder and CTO, Graphcore
James Wang, Analyst, ArkInvest
Igor Carron, CEO, LightOn
12:05 – 12:35

Panel hosted by Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View
Casimir Wierzynski, Senior Director, AI Product Group, Intel
Simon Knowles, Co-Founder and CTO, Graphcore
James Wang, Analyst, ArkInvest
Igor Carron, CEO, LightOn
12:05 – 12:35

Symbolic Representations and Deep Learning
Marta Garnelo, Research Scientist, DeepMind
12:35 – 12:50

Marta Garnelo, Research Scientist, DeepMind
12:35 – 12:50

LUNCH
12:50 – 13:10

12:50 – 13:10

Introduction to the Afternoon
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View and Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
13:10 – 13:20

Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View and Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
13:10 – 13:20

Defining the Cutting Edge of AI: Where We Are and Where We're Going
Jack Clark, Strategy and Communications Director, OpenAI
13:20 – 13:30

Jack Clark, Strategy and Communications Director, OpenAI
13:20 – 13:30

The Edgeification of Intelligence
Joe Baguley, VP and CTO for EMEA, VMware
13:30 – 13:40

Joe Baguley, VP and CTO for EMEA, VMware
13:30 – 13:40

Machine Learning on Tiny, Cheap Devices
Pete Warden, Technical Lead, Tensorflow’s Mobile and Embedded Team
13:40 – 13:50

Pete Warden, Technical Lead, Tensorflow’s Mobile and Embedded Team
13:40 – 13:50

Confidential Cloud and Edge Computing
Jon Crowcroft, Marconi Professor of Communications Systems, University of Cambridge
13:50 – 14:00

Jon Crowcroft, Marconi Professor of Communications Systems, University of Cambridge
13:50 – 14:00

Data & Edgification of Intelligence Panel
Hosted by Ian Hogarth, Co-Founder SongKick
Pete Warden, Technical Lead, Tensorflow’s Mobile and Embedded Team
Jon Crowcroft, Marconi Professor of Communications Systems, University of Cambridge
14:00 – 14:30

Hosted by Ian Hogarth, Co-Founder SongKick
Pete Warden, Technical Lead, Tensorflow’s Mobile and Embedded Team
Jon Crowcroft, Marconi Professor of Communications Systems, University of Cambridge
14:00 – 14:30

The Journey to Safe Urban Autonomy
Stan Boland, CEO, Five.AI
14:30 – 14:50

Stan Boland, CEO, Five.AI
14:30 – 14:50

Understanding AI Progress
Miles Brundage, Research Fellow, University of Oxford Future of Humanity Institute
14:50 – 15:00

Miles Brundage, Research Fellow, University of Oxford Future of Humanity Institute
14:50 – 15:00

AI Plumbing: Bringing Cutting Edge AI Products and Services to Market
Libby Kinsey, Head of Technology and Lead Technologist for AI and ML, Digital Catapult
15:00 – 15:20

Libby Kinsey, Head of Technology and Lead Technologist for AI and ML, Digital Catapult
15:00 – 15:20

What Should Our Data Rights Look Like?
Jeni Tennison, CEO, Open Data Institute in conversation with Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
15:20 – 15:40

Jeni Tennison, CEO, Open Data Institute in conversation with Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
15:20 – 15:40

Simulcast: Impact Stage
15:40 – 17:20

15:40 – 17:20

Day 1: ETHICS
Day 1: ETHICS
Exploring the Changing Attitudes Towards Artificial Intelligence Around the World
Tugce Bulut, CEO, Streetbees in conversation with Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
09:10 – 09:30

Tugce Bulut, CEO, Streetbees in conversation with Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
09:10 – 09:30

AI Narratives: A Prelude to the Stopping of the Pitchforks
Dr Steven Cave, Executive Director, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence
Dr Kanta Dihal, Postdoctoral Researcher, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence
09:30 – 09:50

Dr Steven Cave, Executive Director, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence
Dr Kanta Dihal, Postdoctoral Researcher, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence
09:30 – 09:50

"Stop the Terminator chat" – How to Talk about AI and Avoid the Pitch Fork Moment
Hosted by Dr Sarah Dillon, Lecturer, University of Cambridge
Dr Claire Craig OBE, Director of Science Policy, the Royal Society
Arohi Jain Rajvanshi, Head of Stategy, The Future Society
Sally Davies, Senior Editor, Aeon Magazine
09:50 – 10:30

Conversations on artificial intelligence seem to take on either a tone of wild optimism or of melodramatic pessimism. It seems that it is hard to be neutral about the prospect of intelligent machines; they seem to provoke us to imaginative extremes. Developing and implementing AI technology, however, can be seriously hindered by these extreme narratives. In this session, Dr Stephen Cave and Dr Kanta Dihal from the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge will introduce the research project ‘AI Narratives’, a collaboration with the Royal Society, which aims to examine the stories we tell about AI and the impact they have. In their talk, they will address the importance of narratives as the source of our fears around AI. Subsequently, a panel chaired by Dr Sarah Dillon, co-project lead on AI Narratives, will discuss ways to engage with these narratives and address these fears.

Hosted by Dr Sarah Dillon, Lecturer, University of Cambridge
Dr Claire Craig OBE, Director of Science Policy, the Royal Society
Arohi Jain Rajvanshi, Head of Stategy, The Future Society
Sally Davies, Senior Editor, Aeon Magazine
09:50 – 10:30

Conversations on artificial intelligence seem to take on either a tone of wild optimism or of melodramatic pessimism. It seems that it is hard to be neutral about the prospect of intelligent machines; they seem to provoke us to imaginative extremes. Developing and implementing AI technology, however, can be seriously hindered by these extreme narratives. In this session, Dr Stephen Cave and Dr Kanta Dihal from the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge will introduce the research project ‘AI Narratives’, a collaboration with the Royal Society, which aims to examine the stories we tell about AI and the impact they have. In their talk, they will address the importance of narratives as the source of our fears around AI. Subsequently, a panel chaired by Dr Sarah Dillon, co-project lead on AI Narratives, will discuss ways to engage with these narratives and address these fears.

How Do We Get the Balance of Censorship and Freedom of Speech Right on the Internet, and What Role Can AI Play?
Rt Hon Lord Young of Graffham CH, Former Secretary of State for Employment
10:30 – 10:50

Rt Hon Lord Young of Graffham CH, Former Secretary of State for Employment
10:30 – 10:50

Ethical and Responsible AI – What Do We Need to Think About?
Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
10:50 – 11:10

Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
10:50 – 11:10

CDO Perspectives
Hosted by Roberto Maranca (former Chief Data Officer, Lloyds Banking Group)
Lorraine Waters, Chief Data Officer for Financial Crime Risk, HSBC
Helen Crooks, Chief Data Officer, Lloyd’s of London
Dr Susan Wegner, VP Data Governance, Architecture and Analytics, Deutsche Telekom
Marie Wallace, Analytics Strategist, IBM
11:10 – 12:10

Finally awaken public attention and advanced pieces of regulations around protection of Privacy (aka GDPR) have forced on Data Leader’s desks the problem of the Data Ethics, intended as the additional “care” that firms have to exercise in acquiring, managing, processing and consuming data when human rights and interests are threatened. AI with his inherent hunger for data and potential lack of transparency and proneness to bias, is pushing the envelope even farther and urging for comprehensive and innovative answers. Under the assumption that any framework of Data Ethics should be still strongly aligned to company’s values and purposes, the panel will discuss the journey so far, ponder on the changes to business’ paradigms and depict the vision for the way forward, seen through the eyes of true Data Practitioners.

Hosted by Roberto Maranca (former Chief Data Officer, Lloyds Banking Group)
Lorraine Waters, Chief Data Officer for Financial Crime Risk, HSBC
Helen Crooks, Chief Data Officer, Lloyd’s of London
Dr Susan Wegner, VP Data Governance, Architecture and Analytics, Deutsche Telekom
Marie Wallace, Analytics Strategist, IBM
11:10 – 12:10

Finally awaken public attention and advanced pieces of regulations around protection of Privacy (aka GDPR) have forced on Data Leader’s desks the problem of the Data Ethics, intended as the additional “care” that firms have to exercise in acquiring, managing, processing and consuming data when human rights and interests are threatened. AI with his inherent hunger for data and potential lack of transparency and proneness to bias, is pushing the envelope even farther and urging for comprehensive and innovative answers. Under the assumption that any framework of Data Ethics should be still strongly aligned to company’s values and purposes, the panel will discuss the journey so far, ponder on the changes to business’ paradigms and depict the vision for the way forward, seen through the eyes of true Data Practitioners.

Ethics Beyond GDPR – How Businesses Can Think and Act Beyond Legal Compliance
Hosted by Antony Walker, Deputy CEO, TechUK
Dame Colette Bowe, Trustee, Nuffield Foundation
Hetan Shah, Executive Director, The Royal Statistical Society
Rachel Coldicutt, CEO, Doteveryone
Francesca Rossi, AI Ethics, IBM
Nigel Houlden, Head of Technology Policy, Information Commissioner’s Office
12:10 – 13:00

The current global digital ethics debate comes at a time when businesses are focused on complying with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Compared to hard regulation, ethics can sound academic and ethereal, disconnected from the practical realities of running and growing a business. But this isn’t the case. Ethics is about decision-making. Something that businesses do day-in day-out. Thinking about the ethical implications of innovation in new technology can sound difficult and daunting – a mire to get bogged down in. But when it comes to AI – sound ethical decisions are also likely to be sound business decisions. So how can businesses build ethics into the way they work and think? What kind of tools can help in guiding ethical decision making and what capabilities and capacities do companies need to build across their organisations to identify, consider and address ethical concerns. And does GDPR compliance help or hinder businesses that want to do the right thing?

A panel of business leaders will discuss how ethics can be mainstreamed into businesses focused on pioneering new technologies; the link between regulatory compliance and wider ethical considerations; the role of emerging ethical frameworks being developed by organisations around the world and the potential for simple tools and processes that can help keep businesses on the right track. The panel will also identify examples of best practice and lessons that can be learnt from companies that have already taken an ethical approach to decision making.

Hosted by Antony Walker, Deputy CEO, TechUK
Dame Colette Bowe, Trustee, Nuffield Foundation
Hetan Shah, Executive Director, The Royal Statistical Society
Rachel Coldicutt, CEO, Doteveryone
Francesca Rossi, AI Ethics, IBM
Nigel Houlden, Head of Technology Policy, Information Commissioner’s Office
12:10 – 13:00

The current global digital ethics debate comes at a time when businesses are focused on complying with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Compared to hard regulation, ethics can sound academic and ethereal, disconnected from the practical realities of running and growing a business. But this isn’t the case. Ethics is about decision-making. Something that businesses do day-in day-out. Thinking about the ethical implications of innovation in new technology can sound difficult and daunting – a mire to get bogged down in. But when it comes to AI – sound ethical decisions are also likely to be sound business decisions. So how can businesses build ethics into the way they work and think? What kind of tools can help in guiding ethical decision making and what capabilities and capacities do companies need to build across their organisations to identify, consider and address ethical concerns. And does GDPR compliance help or hinder businesses that want to do the right thing?

A panel of business leaders will discuss how ethics can be mainstreamed into businesses focused on pioneering new technologies; the link between regulatory compliance and wider ethical considerations; the role of emerging ethical frameworks being developed by organisations around the world and the potential for simple tools and processes that can help keep businesses on the right track. The panel will also identify examples of best practice and lessons that can be learnt from companies that have already taken an ethical approach to decision making.

LUNCH
13:00 – 13:30

13:00 – 13:30

Six Degrees of Integration, Because the World is Separate Enough
June Sarpong MBE, TV Presenter, Author of ‘Diversify’
13:30 – 13:50

June Sarpong MBE, TV Presenter, Author of ‘Diversify’
13:30 – 13:50

Why Women in AI – the Need for Diversity in the Data and Training of AI
Hosted by June Sarpong MBE, TV Presenter, Author of ‘Diversify’
Hanna Naima McCloskey, Founder & CEO, Fearless Futures
Josie Young, Feminist AI Researcher, Transformation Manager at Methods and Co-Chair of YWCA
Sofia Olhede, Professor of Statistics, UCL
Carol Reiley, Board Member, Drive.ai
13:50 – 14:30

Hosted by June Sarpong MBE, TV Presenter, Author of ‘Diversify’
Hanna Naima McCloskey, Founder & CEO, Fearless Futures
Josie Young, Feminist AI Researcher, Transformation Manager at Methods and Co-Chair of YWCA
Sofia Olhede, Professor of Statistics, UCL
Carol Reiley, Board Member, Drive.ai
13:50 – 14:30

Communication and Trustworthiness
Baroness Onora O’Neill, Professor Emeritus, University of Cambridge
14:30 – 14:50

Baroness Onora O’Neill, Professor Emeritus, University of Cambridge
14:30 – 14:50

Using AI to Tackle Fake News
Hosted by Lianna Brinded, Quartz
Dhruv Ghulati, CEO and Founder, Factmata
Mevan Babakar, Head of Automated Factchecking, Full Fact
14:50 – 15:10

Hosted by Lianna Brinded, Quartz
Dhruv Ghulati, CEO and Founder, Factmata
Mevan Babakar, Head of Automated Factchecking, Full Fact
14:50 – 15:10

Debate: Should Robots Resemble Humans?
Hosted by Kate Devlin, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths
Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
Alan Winfield, Professor of Robot Ethics, University of the West of England (UWE), Co-Founder, Bristol Robotics Laboratory
David Hanson, CEO and Founder, Hanson Robotics
Will Jackson, Founder and Director, Engineered Arts
15:10 – 16:10

Hosted by Kate Devlin, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths
Joanna Bryson, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, University of Bath
Alan Winfield, Professor of Robot Ethics, University of the West of England (UWE), Co-Founder, Bristol Robotics Laboratory
David Hanson, CEO and Founder, Hanson Robotics
Will Jackson, Founder and Director, Engineered Arts
15:10 – 16:10

Putting Ethics Into Action
Kriti Sharma, Vice President of Artificial Intelligence, Sage in conversation with Sue Daly, Head of Programme for Cloud, Data, Analytics and AI, TechUK
16:10 – 16:30

Kriti Sharma, Vice President of Artificial Intelligence, Sage in conversation with Sue Daly, Head of Programme for Cloud, Data, Analytics and AI, TechUK
16:10 – 16:30

AI for Disaster Response
Dr Robert Munro, CTO Machine Learning, Figure Eight
16:30 – 16:50

Dr Robert Munro, CTO Machine Learning, Figure Eight
16:30 – 16:50

AI is Shaping the World, Who Will Be Shaping AI?
Hearing from young people themselves
Elena Sinel, Founder, Acorn Aspirations in conversation with Peter (17), Lowena (16), Tiff (16) and Kiran (16)
16:50 – 17:30

Elena is a an award-winning social entrepreneur and founder of Teens In AI and Acorn Aspirations, motivated to make a difference in the world by empowering young people aged 12-18 to solve real problems through technologies: AI, VR, AR, MR and blockchain. Elena ran her first hackathon in November 2015 with 150 people, 70 of which were teenagers aged 14-18. Since then, she has run over 10 hackathons, accelerators, bootcamps and a youth conference and worked with over 1500 children from across the world.

Teens In AI is Elena’s latest initiative, spurred by her passion for AI and its ability to create positive and lasting impact on the world. Teens in AI exists to increase diversity and inclusion in artificial intelligence. It aims to democratise AI and create pipelines for underrepresented talent through a combination of expert mentoring, talks, workshops, hackathons, accelerators, company tours and networking opportunities that give young people aged 12-18 early exposure to AI for social good. The vision is for AI to be developed by a diverse group of thinkers and doers advancing AI for humanity’s benefit.

Hearing from young people themselves
Elena Sinel, Founder, Acorn Aspirations in conversation with Peter (17), Lowena (16), Tiff (16) and Kiran (16)
16:50 – 17:30

Elena is a an award-winning social entrepreneur and founder of Teens In AI and Acorn Aspirations, motivated to make a difference in the world by empowering young people aged 12-18 to solve real problems through technologies: AI, VR, AR, MR and blockchain. Elena ran her first hackathon in November 2015 with 150 people, 70 of which were teenagers aged 14-18. Since then, she has run over 10 hackathons, accelerators, bootcamps and a youth conference and worked with over 1500 children from across the world.

Teens In AI is Elena’s latest initiative, spurred by her passion for AI and its ability to create positive and lasting impact on the world. Teens in AI exists to increase diversity and inclusion in artificial intelligence. It aims to democratise AI and create pipelines for underrepresented talent through a combination of expert mentoring, talks, workshops, hackathons, accelerators, company tours and networking opportunities that give young people aged 12-18 early exposure to AI for social good. The vision is for AI to be developed by a diverse group of thinkers and doers advancing AI for humanity’s benefit.

Marvin the Paranoid Android and the Moral Code
Robbie Stamp, CEO and Founder, Bioss
17:30 – 18:10

Robbie Stamp, CEO and Founder, Bioss
17:30 – 18:10

Day 1: LAB TO LIVE
Day 1: LAB TO LIVE
AI and the Road to AGI
Alison B. Lowndes, AI DevRel EMEA, NVIDIA
09:50 – 10:10

Alison B. Lowndes, AI DevRel EMEA, NVIDIA
09:50 – 10:10

Moving Fast with ML in Production and Not Breaking Things
Alex Housley, CEO and Founder, Seldon
10:10 – 10:30

Alex Housley, CEO and Founder, Seldon
10:10 – 10:30

How Relevance Became the New KPI for Banks
Ranil Boteju, Global Head of Analytics & CRM, HSBC
10:30 – 10:40

Ranil Boteju, Global Head of Analytics & CRM, HSBC
10:30 – 10:40

Changing the Face of Banking by Putting the Customer First
Anne Boden, CEO and Founder, Starling Bank
10:40 – 10:50

Anne Boden, CEO and Founder, Starling Bank
10:40 – 10:50

Q&A with Jeremy Kahn, Senior Reporter, Bloomberg
Anne Boden, CEO and Founder, Starling Bank
Ranil Boteju, Global Head of Analytics & CRM, HSBC
10:50 – 11:10

Anne Boden, CEO and Founder, Starling Bank
Ranil Boteju, Global Head of Analytics & CRM, HSBC
10:50 – 11:10

Learnings From a Company Developing and Manufacturing Robots on a Mass Scale
Boris Sofman, Founder and CEO, ANKI
11:10 – 11:30

Boris Sofman, Founder and CEO, ANKI
11:10 – 11:30

Making Art Smart: How Can AI and Machine Learning Contribute to the Creative Industries?
Hosted by Susan Boster, Managing Director, Boster Group
Josie Rourke, Artistic Director, Donmar Warehouse
Thomas Hoegh, Artist, Entrepreneur and Investor
Chance Coughenour, Programme Manager, Google Arts and Culture
Charlotte Stix Research Associate, AI Policy and Responsible Innovation Project, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
11:30 – 12:10

Is arts and culture ready to be disrupted, or is AI just another tool in an artist’s paint box? Opening with a dramatic experience from acclaimed theatre director Josie Rourke, this panel explores how current technology trends are interacting with arts and culture. Bringing together a wealth of viewpoints in arts, technology and philanthropy, the panelists include Josie Rourke, a director renowned for integrating theatre with digital, Amit Sood, Director of Google Arts & Culture and Thomas Hoegh, Artist, Entrepreneur and Investor. They will explore how emerging technologies function both as artistic tools and as solutions to problems facing the creative industries.

Hosted by Susan Boster, Managing Director, Boster Group
Josie Rourke, Artistic Director, Donmar Warehouse
Thomas Hoegh, Artist, Entrepreneur and Investor
Chance Coughenour, Programme Manager, Google Arts and Culture
Charlotte Stix Research Associate, AI Policy and Responsible Innovation Project, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
11:30 – 12:10

Is arts and culture ready to be disrupted, or is AI just another tool in an artist’s paint box? Opening with a dramatic experience from acclaimed theatre director Josie Rourke, this panel explores how current technology trends are interacting with arts and culture. Bringing together a wealth of viewpoints in arts, technology and philanthropy, the panelists include Josie Rourke, a director renowned for integrating theatre with digital, Amit Sood, Director of Google Arts & Culture and Thomas Hoegh, Artist, Entrepreneur and Investor. They will explore how emerging technologies function both as artistic tools and as solutions to problems facing the creative industries.

How is AI Changing Music?
Hosted by Georgia Lewis Anderson, Broadcaster, Journalist, AI Personality Designer
Ed Newton-Rex, CEO and Founder, Jukedeck
Hazel Savage, Founder, Musiio
Sophie Goossens, Digital Media Lawyer, Reed Smith
12:10 – 12:50

Hosted by Georgia Lewis Anderson, Broadcaster, Journalist, AI Personality Designer
Ed Newton-Rex, CEO and Founder, Jukedeck
Hazel Savage, Founder, Musiio
Sophie Goossens, Digital Media Lawyer, Reed Smith
12:10 – 12:50

LUNCH
12:50 – 13:30

12:50 – 13:30

Digital Transformation and Artificial Intelligence in Retail Logistics: A Case Study
Daniel Hulme, CEO, Satalia
Russell Harte, Head of Technology, DFS
13:30 – 13:50

Daniel Hulme, CEO, Satalia
Russell Harte, Head of Technology, DFS
13:30 – 13:50

Marketing and Advertising Redefined in the Age of AI
Hosted by Tracey Follows, Head of Strategy, WIRED Consulting, WIRED UK
Jessica Rusu, Senior Director EU Analytics & Research, eBay
Anastasia Leng, CEO and Founder, Picasso Labs
Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist, Brave Software
13:50 – 14:30

Hosted by Tracey Follows, Head of Strategy, WIRED Consulting, WIRED UK
Jessica Rusu, Senior Director EU Analytics & Research, eBay
Anastasia Leng, CEO and Founder, Picasso Labs
Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist, Brave Software
13:50 – 14:30

Art and AI Driving the Fan Experience at Wimbledon with IBM – A Case Study
Alex Willis, Head of Communications, Digital and Content, AELTC/Wimbledon
14:30 – 14:50

Alex Willis, Head of Communications, Digital and Content, AELTC/Wimbledon
14:30 – 14:50

Death to the Pilot: Doing AI at Scale
Chris Wigley, COO, QuantumBlack
14:50 – 15:10

Chris Wigley, COO, QuantumBlack
14:50 – 15:10

Death to the Pilot: Doing AI at Scale Panel
Panel hosted by Chris Wigley, COO, QuantumBlack
Alice Breeden, Partner, Global Lead, Organisation and Team Acceleration, Heidrick (previously Director People Operations, EMEA, Google)
Marc Lien, Machine Intelligence Applied AI Programme, Lloyds Banking Group
Sophie Richardson, Data and AI Lead, Customer Success Unit, Microsoft
15:10 – 15:50

Panel hosted by Chris Wigley, COO, QuantumBlack
Alice Breeden, Partner, Global Lead, Organisation and Team Acceleration, Heidrick (previously Director People Operations, EMEA, Google)
Marc Lien, Machine Intelligence Applied AI Programme, Lloyds Banking Group
Sophie Richardson, Data and AI Lead, Customer Success Unit, Microsoft
15:10 – 15:50

Chatbots: Introduction
Julian Harris, Head of Technical Research, CognitionX
15:50 – 16:00

Julian Harris, Head of Technical Research, CognitionX
15:50 – 16:00

Chatbots: A Case Study – Scaling Amazon Alexa
Catherine Breslin, Manager, Applied Science, Amazon Alexa
16:00 – 16:10

Catherine Breslin, Manager, Applied Science, Amazon Alexa
16:00 – 16:10

Chatbots: A Case Study – Customer Service Automation with Chatbots and Image Recognition
Harry McCarney, CEO and Founder, Hack and Craft
Paula McKillen, Head of Automation, RS Components
16:10 – 16:30

Harry McCarney, CEO and Founder, Hack and Craft
Paula McKillen, Head of Automation, RS Components
16:10 – 16:30

Chatbots: A Case Study – Building a Chatbot to Combat Workplace Harassment
Dr Julia Shaw, Co-Founder, Spot
16:30 – 16:40

Dr Julia Shaw, Co-Founder, Spot
16:30 – 16:40

The Future of Chatbots
Hosted by Julian Harris, Head of Technical Research, CognitionX
William Tunstall-Pedoe, Founder, Evi (became Amazon’s Alexa)
Dr Julia Shaw, Co-Founder, Spot
Tobias Goebel, Sr. Director Emerging Tech, Aspect (Lead Architect for Lidl UK’s “Margot the Winebot”)
Lauren Kunze, CEO, Pandorabots
Alexander Weidauer, Co-Founder and CEO, Rasa
Alice Zimmermann, Google Assistant UK Lead, Google
16:40 – 17:30

Hosted by Julian Harris, Head of Technical Research, CognitionX
William Tunstall-Pedoe, Founder, Evi (became Amazon’s Alexa)
Dr Julia Shaw, Co-Founder, Spot
Tobias Goebel, Sr. Director Emerging Tech, Aspect (Lead Architect for Lidl UK’s “Margot the Winebot”)
Lauren Kunze, CEO, Pandorabots
Alexander Weidauer, Co-Founder and CEO, Rasa
Alice Zimmermann, Google Assistant UK Lead, Google
16:40 – 17:30

Day 1: BLOCKCHAIN
Day 1: BLOCKCHAIN
The Shift Towards Human-Centric Computing
Keynote: Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
09:10 – 09:30

Keynote: Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
09:10 – 09:30

Envisioning Token-Based Decentralised Networks
Vinay Gupta (Founder, Mattereum & hexayurt.capital) in conversation with Damian Kimmelman, Co-Founder and CEO, DueDil
09:30 – 09:50

Vinay Gupta (Founder, Mattereum & hexayurt.capital) in conversation with Damian Kimmelman, Co-Founder and CEO, DueDil
09:30 – 09:50

Token Regulation: Perspectives from Europe and the US
David Booth, Product & Investments, Coinlist
Olga Feldmeier, CEO, Smart Valor
Lord Chris Holmes, Member of the House of Lords, UK Parliament
Eva Kaili, Member of the European Parliament
Joe Woodbury, Director, Investment Management Solutions, Lawson Conner
09:50 – 10:50

David Booth, Product & Investments, Coinlist
Olga Feldmeier, CEO, Smart Valor
Lord Chris Holmes, Member of the House of Lords, UK Parliament
Eva Kaili, Member of the European Parliament
Joe Woodbury, Director, Investment Management Solutions, Lawson Conner
09:50 – 10:50

Mike Novogratz, Founder and CEO, Galaxy Digital Capital Management
In conversation with Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
10:50 – 11:10

In conversation with Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
10:50 – 11:10

Governance of Projects, Organisations, and States
Hosted by Alessandra Sollberger, Founder & CEO, Evermore
Jouni Helminen, Aragon
Jack du Rose, Co-Founder, Colony
Christina Frankopan, Venture Partner, Fabric Ventures
Marcel Dietsch, Co-founder & CEO, Covee Network
11:10 – 12:10

Hosted by Alessandra Sollberger, Founder & CEO, Evermore
Jouni Helminen, Aragon
Jack du Rose, Co-Founder, Colony
Christina Frankopan, Venture Partner, Fabric Ventures
Marcel Dietsch, Co-founder & CEO, Covee Network
11:10 – 12:10

The Business of Blockchain – Where We Are and Where We Are Going
Jeremy Millar, Chief of Staff, ConsenSys and Founding Board Member, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance
12:10 – 12:30

Jeremy Millar, Chief of Staff, ConsenSys and Founding Board Member, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance
12:10 – 12:30

LUNCH
12:20 – 13:20

12:20 – 13:20

Lightning Talks
13:20 – 14:20

13:20 – 14:20

The Roadmap of Protocol Upgrades: Unpacking Scalability & Interoperability
Hosted by Rob de Feo, Startup Solutions Architect, AWS
Peter Czaban, Executive Director, Web 3 Foundation
Jutta Steiner, Co-Founder and CEO, Parity Technologies
14:20 – 15:00

Hosted by Rob de Feo, Startup Solutions Architect, AWS
Peter Czaban, Executive Director, Web 3 Foundation
Jutta Steiner, Co-Founder and CEO, Parity Technologies
14:20 – 15:00

Introducing JARVIS: The World's First Video Opinion Search Engine
Shaukat Shamim, Founder & CEO, YouPlus
15:00 – 15:20

Shaukat Shamim, Founder & CEO, YouPlus
15:00 – 15:20

Special Guest
15:20 – 15:40

15:20 – 15:40

Tokenising Non-Fungible Assets
Hosted by Chris Burniske, Partner, Placeholder
Robert Norton, CEO, Verisart
Charlie Noyes, Principal, Pantera
Jure Zih, Founder & CEO, 0xcert
15:40 – 16:20

Hosted by Chris Burniske, Partner, Placeholder
Robert Norton, CEO, Verisart
Charlie Noyes, Principal, Pantera
Jure Zih, Founder & CEO, 0xcert
15:40 – 16:20

The Path Forward
Vinay Gupta, Founder, Mattereum & hexayurt.capital
Dr Neil Pennington, Advisor, Energy Web Foundation
Brennan Carley, Global Head of Enterprise, Thomson Reuters
Loretta Joseph, Fintech & Regulatory Advisor, Government of Bermuda
16:20 – 17:20

Vinay Gupta, Founder, Mattereum & hexayurt.capital
Dr Neil Pennington, Advisor, Energy Web Foundation
Brennan Carley, Global Head of Enterprise, Thomson Reuters
Loretta Joseph, Fintech & Regulatory Advisor, Government of Bermuda
16:20 – 17:20

Satoshi is Female
Keynote: Nyla Rodgers, founder of Mama Hope & Advocate of Females in Blockchain
17:20 – 17:50

Keynote: Nyla Rodgers, founder of Mama Hope & Advocate of Females in Blockchain
17:20 – 17:50

Day 1: TURING RESEARCH
Day 1: TURING RESEARCH
Opening the Turing Research Stage
Christine Foster, Managing Director for Innovation for the Turing Institute
10:30 – 10:40

Christine Foster, Managing Director for Innovation for the Turing Institute
10:30 – 10:40

Exploring the Research Landscape at The Alan Turing Institute
Emily Nielson, Programme Coordinator – The Alan Turing Institute
Mark Briers, Programme Director for Defence and Security – The Alan Turing Institute
10:40 – 11:00

Emily Nielson, Programme Coordinator – The Alan Turing Institute
Mark Briers, Programme Director for Defence and Security – The Alan Turing Institute
10:40 – 11:00

Alan Turing, Data Science and processing Big Data
Mark Briers, Programme Director for Defence and Security – The Alan Turing Institute
11:00 – 11:20

In this talk, I will introduce the role of data science in World War II and how multi-disciplinary teams helped to crack the enigma code. This will help to motivate current data science problems in Cyber security, and the role of Bayesian statistical analysis using Monte Carlo methods.

Mark Briers, Programme Director for Defence and Security – The Alan Turing Institute
11:00 – 11:20

In this talk, I will introduce the role of data science in World War II and how multi-disciplinary teams helped to crack the enigma code. This will help to motivate current data science problems in Cyber security, and the role of Bayesian statistical analysis using Monte Carlo methods.

Soft Robotics for Safe Human-Robot Interaction
Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Queen Mary University of London
11:20 – 11:40

Despite an increasing interest in soft robotics amongst roboticists, most industries continue to rely on traditional, rigid-component robots which revolutionised manufacturing in the 1960s. Modern application areas, such as robot-assisted keyhole surgery, tend to make use of similar tried and tested robot principles, even though these gargantuan, hapless steel robots such as the da Vinci® Surgical System are now commanded to get into closest contact with humans during surgical procedures. Flexible, continuum and other soft robots emerging in the research labs worldwide show promise for many application areas, especially where robots are required to interact with humans, for example in the modern operating theatre, during robot-assisted rehabilitation and in the factory of the future. My research is very much driven by an interest in creating robotic structures that are capable of adapting to their environments better than their traditional rigid-body robot counterparts could and conducting manipulation tasks more easily whilst at the same time reducing the computational burden of control and motion planning. Departing from the traditional types of robots, which are fundamentally based on a structure composed of rigid link elements connected via joints, we have created soft and stiffness-controllable manipulators achieving a high range of dexterity and improving safety. I will highlight the conceptual ideas behind the work, report on our achievements in the context of robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery and safe human-robot interaction in the manufacturing environment. Challenges emerging when departing from traditionally rigid tools and progressing towards flexible and even stiffness-controllable robot manipulators will be discussed.

Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Queen Mary University of London
11:20 – 11:40

Despite an increasing interest in soft robotics amongst roboticists, most industries continue to rely on traditional, rigid-component robots which revolutionised manufacturing in the 1960s. Modern application areas, such as robot-assisted keyhole surgery, tend to make use of similar tried and tested robot principles, even though these gargantuan, hapless steel robots such as the da Vinci® Surgical System are now commanded to get into closest contact with humans during surgical procedures. Flexible, continuum and other soft robots emerging in the research labs worldwide show promise for many application areas, especially where robots are required to interact with humans, for example in the modern operating theatre, during robot-assisted rehabilitation and in the factory of the future. My research is very much driven by an interest in creating robotic structures that are capable of adapting to their environments better than their traditional rigid-body robot counterparts could and conducting manipulation tasks more easily whilst at the same time reducing the computational burden of control and motion planning. Departing from the traditional types of robots, which are fundamentally based on a structure composed of rigid link elements connected via joints, we have created soft and stiffness-controllable manipulators achieving a high range of dexterity and improving safety. I will highlight the conceptual ideas behind the work, report on our achievements in the context of robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery and safe human-robot interaction in the manufacturing environment. Challenges emerging when departing from traditionally rigid tools and progressing towards flexible and even stiffness-controllable robot manipulators will be discussed.

Deconstructing Gaussian Processes (GPs)
Vidhi Lalchand, University of Cambridge
11:40 – 12:00

The talk will start with an introduction to GPs and their interpretation as a machine learning tool for regression and classification tasks. More importantly, how they enable Bayesian optimization. There will be a discussion on the nuances of a GP which will bring out its nonparametric nature followed by comments on its computational performance and the need for sparse GPs. This will be followed by a demonstration of GP training using an interactive video. Finally, there will be a discussion of applications for GPs

Vidhi Lalchand, University of Cambridge
11:40 – 12:00

The talk will start with an introduction to GPs and their interpretation as a machine learning tool for regression and classification tasks. More importantly, how they enable Bayesian optimization. There will be a discussion on the nuances of a GP which will bring out its nonparametric nature followed by comments on its computational performance and the need for sparse GPs. This will be followed by a demonstration of GP training using an interactive video. Finally, there will be a discussion of applications for GPs

LUNCH
12:00 – 13:00

12:00 – 13:00

The Importance of Estimating Uncertainty: a Stein Variational Newton Method
Gianluca Detommaso, University of Bath
13:00 – 13:20

The world is complex and uncertain. Perfect predictions are impossible; the best we can do is to extrapolate information, analyse, estimate. But how sure are we about our estimates? How confidently can we assume a stock price will go up, a 3D-printed bridge will not collapse, a self-driving car will account for unexpected situations? As AI progressively takes the lead of our lives, the ability to correctly estimate the uncertainty around its predictions becomes of fundamental importance. In this talk, I am going to present a Stein variational Newton (SVN) method, our own extension to a cutting-edge research family of sampling algorithms recently developed in the Machine Learning community. Sampling means being able to draw outcomes according to how likely they are to appear. SVN is able to learn the most likely outcomes, as well as correctly estimating their uncertainty. The way it works is deterministic, embarrassingly parallelisable and easy to implement: a set of particles gets sequentially transported towards high-probability outcomes, eventually representing what is addressed as their “probability density”. SVN distinguishes itself as it introduces second-order information to accelerate the transportation of the particles and to spread them efficiently. We will visualise with some videos how it quickly and appropriately distributes the particles over the likely outcomes, and it is robust when new information suddenly changes their probability density.

Gianluca Detommaso, University of Bath
13:00 – 13:20

The world is complex and uncertain. Perfect predictions are impossible; the best we can do is to extrapolate information, analyse, estimate. But how sure are we about our estimates? How confidently can we assume a stock price will go up, a 3D-printed bridge will not collapse, a self-driving car will account for unexpected situations? As AI progressively takes the lead of our lives, the ability to correctly estimate the uncertainty around its predictions becomes of fundamental importance. In this talk, I am going to present a Stein variational Newton (SVN) method, our own extension to a cutting-edge research family of sampling algorithms recently developed in the Machine Learning community. Sampling means being able to draw outcomes according to how likely they are to appear. SVN is able to learn the most likely outcomes, as well as correctly estimating their uncertainty. The way it works is deterministic, embarrassingly parallelisable and easy to implement: a set of particles gets sequentially transported towards high-probability outcomes, eventually representing what is addressed as their “probability density”. SVN distinguishes itself as it introduces second-order information to accelerate the transportation of the particles and to spread them efficiently. We will visualise with some videos how it quickly and appropriately distributes the particles over the likely outcomes, and it is robust when new information suddenly changes their probability density.

The Gamma – Towards open and reproducible data-driven storytelling
Tomas Petriek, University of Kent
13:20 – 13:40

Governments, journalists and citizen initiatives make increasing amounts of raw data publicly available online. In this environment of sensory overload, “post-truth” has been chosen as the word of the year 2016 and the general public increasingly distrusts statistics and experts. In other words, data science has more capabilities to help us understand the world than ever before, yet it is becoming less relevant in public discussion. What can we do to get more people interested in data and make claims backed by data more attractive? The goal of The Gamma project is to democratize data science. Our tools allow journalists to create transparent data-driven articles where each visualization is backed by a simple code snippet. The source code makes the visualization reproducible, but it also lets the readers check how data is aggregated, modify parameters or even explore other aspects of the data. In this talk, I will show a number of innovative transparent data visualizations that we built using The Gamma, including ones looking at the UK Open Government data and the history of Olympic medalists and I will show how you too can make your data visualizations more transparent, open and reproducible.

Tomas Petriek, University of Kent
13:20 – 13:40

Governments, journalists and citizen initiatives make increasing amounts of raw data publicly available online. In this environment of sensory overload, “post-truth” has been chosen as the word of the year 2016 and the general public increasingly distrusts statistics and experts. In other words, data science has more capabilities to help us understand the world than ever before, yet it is becoming less relevant in public discussion. What can we do to get more people interested in data and make claims backed by data more attractive? The goal of The Gamma project is to democratize data science. Our tools allow journalists to create transparent data-driven articles where each visualization is backed by a simple code snippet. The source code makes the visualization reproducible, but it also lets the readers check how data is aggregated, modify parameters or even explore other aspects of the data. In this talk, I will show a number of innovative transparent data visualizations that we built using The Gamma, including ones looking at the UK Open Government data and the history of Olympic medalists and I will show how you too can make your data visualizations more transparent, open and reproducible.

Are Nurses the Real Heroes – Using Artificial Intelligence to Disentangle Complex Interactions
Tammo Rukat, University of Oxford
13:40 – 14:00

Smart watches’ proximity records are only one example of the plethora of newly emerging data-sources that cannot effectively be analysed by humans due to the enormous volumes of data produced. Instead they require artificial intelligence to provide actionable insights. Conventional machine learning models often assume a logic whereby outcomes of interest are related to all the different underlying causes, e.g. heart disease = Obesity AND Smoking AND Exercise AND Genetic. Whilst these contributory factors exist in the general population, in any individual, only a single factor may be required to trigger the outcome, heart disease = Obesity OR Smoking OR Exercise OR Genetics. We have devised an ML algorithm, the “TensOr Machine”, that provides a means to learn using the latter logic. To give an example, smart watch proximity sensors have been used for one week in a hospital ward to record around 80,000 interactions between different individuals (medical doctors, nurses, patients and administrative stuff) during the day. Here, the OR-logic assumes that proximity of two co-workers can be explained by one of its possible causes, e.g. care of the same patient OR a joint coffee break. We were able to analyse this 3-dimensional data – time, individual A, individual B – to extract patterns of interactions between individuals during the day in this ward. Strikingly, using this proximity data alone, we were able to recapitulate information about the work patterns of staff groups. For example, we find groups that correspond to the main morning and afternoon clinic hours when all admin, medical and nursing staff came into interaction. Whilst 2-3 PM indicated a rest period in which nurses and admin staff were heavily interacting without participation of medical doctors. Nurses however were active throughout the day including being the main staffing body at night.

Tammo Rukat, University of Oxford
13:40 – 14:00

Smart watches’ proximity records are only one example of the plethora of newly emerging data-sources that cannot effectively be analysed by humans due to the enormous volumes of data produced. Instead they require artificial intelligence to provide actionable insights. Conventional machine learning models often assume a logic whereby outcomes of interest are related to all the different underlying causes, e.g. heart disease = Obesity AND Smoking AND Exercise AND Genetic. Whilst these contributory factors exist in the general population, in any individual, only a single factor may be required to trigger the outcome, heart disease = Obesity OR Smoking OR Exercise OR Genetics. We have devised an ML algorithm, the “TensOr Machine”, that provides a means to learn using the latter logic. To give an example, smart watch proximity sensors have been used for one week in a hospital ward to record around 80,000 interactions between different individuals (medical doctors, nurses, patients and administrative stuff) during the day. Here, the OR-logic assumes that proximity of two co-workers can be explained by one of its possible causes, e.g. care of the same patient OR a joint coffee break. We were able to analyse this 3-dimensional data – time, individual A, individual B – to extract patterns of interactions between individuals during the day in this ward. Strikingly, using this proximity data alone, we were able to recapitulate information about the work patterns of staff groups. For example, we find groups that correspond to the main morning and afternoon clinic hours when all admin, medical and nursing staff came into interaction. Whilst 2-3 PM indicated a rest period in which nurses and admin staff were heavily interacting without participation of medical doctors. Nurses however were active throughout the day including being the main staffing body at night.

AI and Genomics: Modelling Human Disease Progression Using Machine Learning
Dr Christopher Yau, University of Birmingham
14:00 – 14:20

Revolutionary advances in genomic technologies in the last 20 years have enabled us to study the molecular basis of human disease and revealed biological details that cannot be observed at the macroscopic level. Genomics routinely produces high-dimensional data sets that defy direct human interpretation and require machine-based analysis. This talk will describe how we can use machine learning together with genomic data to construct molecular-based maps of human disease progression that will enable us to predict how a patient’s condition could evolve and provide insight into novel targets for the development of new treatments.

Dr Christopher Yau, University of Birmingham
14:00 – 14:20

Revolutionary advances in genomic technologies in the last 20 years have enabled us to study the molecular basis of human disease and revealed biological details that cannot be observed at the macroscopic level. Genomics routinely produces high-dimensional data sets that defy direct human interpretation and require machine-based analysis. This talk will describe how we can use machine learning together with genomic data to construct molecular-based maps of human disease progression that will enable us to predict how a patient’s condition could evolve and provide insight into novel targets for the development of new treatments.

Towards an understanding of CNNs – information highways and navigating the net
Michael Murray, University of Oxford
14:20 – 14:40

Ever since the arrival of AlexNet in 2012, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have represented the state of the art for tackling many tasks in computer vision. However, although their empirical success and practical usefulness is undeniable, exactly why they perform as well as they do is not fully understood. Confidence in their performance is typically based upon empirical testing and heuristics rather than a comprehensive theoretical platform. In low risk applications, for instance advertising, this is not a cause for concern since the only cost is a lost sales opportunity. However, in higher risk applications where safety could be compromised, for example in self driving cars, understanding the robustness of these systems and their failure modes is essential. In this talk I will present some recent work in which we seek to better understand CNNs and the role of activation pathways by interpreting the forward pass as solving a sequence of sparse coding problems. I will firstly discuss what an activation pathway is and why it might be considered important. Then I will review the recently proposed Deep Convolutional Sparse Coding framework (DCSC) and some of its rich connections with CNNs. Finally I will present a probabilistic bound on the recovery of a given activation pathway by the forward pass algorithm. This will be a high level talk and does not assume any prior knowledge other than a basic understanding of CNNs.

Michael Murray, University of Oxford
14:20 – 14:40

Ever since the arrival of AlexNet in 2012, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have represented the state of the art for tackling many tasks in computer vision. However, although their empirical success and practical usefulness is undeniable, exactly why they perform as well as they do is not fully understood. Confidence in their performance is typically based upon empirical testing and heuristics rather than a comprehensive theoretical platform. In low risk applications, for instance advertising, this is not a cause for concern since the only cost is a lost sales opportunity. However, in higher risk applications where safety could be compromised, for example in self driving cars, understanding the robustness of these systems and their failure modes is essential. In this talk I will present some recent work in which we seek to better understand CNNs and the role of activation pathways by interpreting the forward pass as solving a sequence of sparse coding problems. I will firstly discuss what an activation pathway is and why it might be considered important. Then I will review the recently proposed Deep Convolutional Sparse Coding framework (DCSC) and some of its rich connections with CNNs. Finally I will present a probabilistic bound on the recovery of a given activation pathway by the forward pass algorithm. This will be a high level talk and does not assume any prior knowledge other than a basic understanding of CNNs.

Social Interactions in Online Eating Disorder Communities: A Network Perspective
Tao Wang, University of Southampton
14:40 – 15:00

Online health communities facilitate communication among people with health problems. Most prior studies focus on examining characteristics of these communities in sharing content, while limited work has explored social interactions between communities with different stances on a health problem. Here, we analyse a large communication network of individuals affected by eating disorders on Twitter and explore how communities and individuals with different stances on the disease interact online. Based on a large set of tweets posted by individuals who self-identify with eating disorders online, we established the existence of two communities: a large community reinforcing disordered eating behaviours and a second, smaller community supporting efforts to recover from the disease. We find that individuals tend to mainly interact with others within the same community, with limited interactions across communities and inter-community interactions characterized by more negative emotions than intra-community interactions. Moreover, by studying the associations between individuals’ behavioural characteristics and interpersonal connections in the communication network, we present the first large-scale investigation of social norms in online health communities, particularly on how a community approves of individuals’ behaviours. Our findings shed new light on how people form online health communities and can have broad clinical implications on disease prevention and online intervention.

Tao Wang, University of Southampton
14:40 – 15:00

Online health communities facilitate communication among people with health problems. Most prior studies focus on examining characteristics of these communities in sharing content, while limited work has explored social interactions between communities with different stances on a health problem. Here, we analyse a large communication network of individuals affected by eating disorders on Twitter and explore how communities and individuals with different stances on the disease interact online. Based on a large set of tweets posted by individuals who self-identify with eating disorders online, we established the existence of two communities: a large community reinforcing disordered eating behaviours and a second, smaller community supporting efforts to recover from the disease. We find that individuals tend to mainly interact with others within the same community, with limited interactions across communities and inter-community interactions characterized by more negative emotions than intra-community interactions. Moreover, by studying the associations between individuals’ behavioural characteristics and interpersonal connections in the communication network, we present the first large-scale investigation of social norms in online health communities, particularly on how a community approves of individuals’ behaviours. Our findings shed new light on how people form online health communities and can have broad clinical implications on disease prevention and online intervention.

Break
15:00 – 15:20

15:00 – 15:20

Quantifying Human Behaviour Using Social Media Images
Merve Alanyali, University of Warwick
15:20 – 15:40

From online searches to social media posts, our everyday interactions with the Internet are creating vast amounts of data. Large volumes of this data can be accessed rapidly at low cost, opening up unprecedented possibilities to monitor and analyse social processes and measure human behaviour.

As Internet connectivity has continued to improve, photo-sharing platforms such as Instagram and Flickr have gained widespread popularity. At the same time, considerable advances have been witnessed in the power of computers to analyse the contents of images. In my talk, I will focus on using deep learning based methods to analyse photographs shared on Instagram to estimate household income across London and New York City.

Merve Alanyali, University of Warwick
15:20 – 15:40

From online searches to social media posts, our everyday interactions with the Internet are creating vast amounts of data. Large volumes of this data can be accessed rapidly at low cost, opening up unprecedented possibilities to monitor and analyse social processes and measure human behaviour.

As Internet connectivity has continued to improve, photo-sharing platforms such as Instagram and Flickr have gained widespread popularity. At the same time, considerable advances have been witnessed in the power of computers to analyse the contents of images. In my talk, I will focus on using deep learning based methods to analyse photographs shared on Instagram to estimate household income across London and New York City.

AI in Designing Better Cities
Chanuki Seresinhe, University of Warwick
Dr Stephen Law, University College London
15:40 – 16:00

It seems evident that the design of the built environment influences many aspects of our lives, this is only amplified by urban environments. For example, design features such as ceiling height or the arrangement of windows can influence the amount of natural light filtering into a home and thus the wellbeing of those living in it. In a city, the placement and density of landmarks can influence the city’s legibility, accessibility and infrastructure. However, to date, the discussion regarding what urban design attributes lead to better cities has largely been theoretical, supported quantitatively only by small scale studies. Thus, our cities have been developed with limited quantitative insights into how the design of their buildings and infrastructure might impact residents. We’ve utilized recent advances in computer vision and deep learning to understand salient design features of the built environment and how they influence key aspects of urban planning such as economic progress, transportation and residential wellbeing. Two case studies are presented: the first concerns measuring the perceptions of built environments, such as beauty and its connection to wellbeing; the second concerns specific characteristics of urban environment, such as building frontage, and estimating connection to house prices. Quantifying aspects of urban design on a massive scale is crucial to help build scientific evidence to design more socially cohesive and economically prosperous cities.

Chanuki Seresinhe, University of Warwick
Dr Stephen Law, University College London
15:40 – 16:00

It seems evident that the design of the built environment influences many aspects of our lives, this is only amplified by urban environments. For example, design features such as ceiling height or the arrangement of windows can influence the amount of natural light filtering into a home and thus the wellbeing of those living in it. In a city, the placement and density of landmarks can influence the city’s legibility, accessibility and infrastructure. However, to date, the discussion regarding what urban design attributes lead to better cities has largely been theoretical, supported quantitatively only by small scale studies. Thus, our cities have been developed with limited quantitative insights into how the design of their buildings and infrastructure might impact residents. We’ve utilized recent advances in computer vision and deep learning to understand salient design features of the built environment and how they influence key aspects of urban planning such as economic progress, transportation and residential wellbeing. Two case studies are presented: the first concerns measuring the perceptions of built environments, such as beauty and its connection to wellbeing; the second concerns specific characteristics of urban environment, such as building frontage, and estimating connection to house prices. Quantifying aspects of urban design on a massive scale is crucial to help build scientific evidence to design more socially cohesive and economically prosperous cities.

Computation and Topological Data Analysis
Dr. Rodrigo Mendoza-Smith, Researcher, Optimisation for Vision at Learning Group, University of Oxford
16:00 – 16:20

In this talk, I give a general introduction to topological data analysis and its associated computational challenges. Topological Data Analysis is a relatively new paradigm in data-science that models datasets as point-clouds sampled from differentiable mathematical objects. The inference problem is to model the dataset as a set of points and estimate topological features from it. This is done through a technique called persistent homology which is a mathematical formalism based on algebraic topology, which is hard to compute. I present a new algorithm fit for GPUs that speeds up the process by several orders of magnitude by exploiting the structure in the underlying data.

Dr. Rodrigo Mendoza-Smith, Researcher, Optimisation for Vision at Learning Group, University of Oxford
16:00 – 16:20

In this talk, I give a general introduction to topological data analysis and its associated computational challenges. Topological Data Analysis is a relatively new paradigm in data-science that models datasets as point-clouds sampled from differentiable mathematical objects. The inference problem is to model the dataset as a set of points and estimate topological features from it. This is done through a technique called persistent homology which is a mathematical formalism based on algebraic topology, which is hard to compute. I present a new algorithm fit for GPUs that speeds up the process by several orders of magnitude by exploiting the structure in the underlying data.

Predict to prepare, but not (necessarily) to prevent the importance of context-sensitive, theory-driven analyses for causal inference (and prediction)
The Importance of Context-sensitive, Theory-driven Analyses for Causal Inference (and Prediction)

George Ellison, Leeds Institute for Data Analytics – University of Leeds
Contributors: Peter Tennant and Mark Gilthorpe 16:20 – 16:40

In the excitement surrounding AI and ‘deep learning’ it is easy to lose sight of what machine-led algorithmic approaches to (‘Big’) data analytics can and can’t do. These approaches can help us prepare for (and, occasionally, prevent) future events based on ‘postdiction’ – i.e. predictions based on the modelling of past events. However, ‘postdiction’ can’t help us prepare for the future if the contexts/circumstances differ from those in the past; and it can’t help us prevent future events if our interventions alter the contexts and/or circumstances on which its predictions depend (as occurs when our interventions are designed to alter one or more of the predictor variables). Such designs are commonplace within applied data analytics – where predictors are routinely mistaken for (likely) causes – even though the mathematical processes underpinning algorithmic prediction mean that non-causal variables are often more powerful predictors than those that are genuine causes (and where genuine causes are often selected out of predictive models to ‘improve’ model fit). Under these circumstances, ‘theory’-driven inclusion of known causes in predictive algorithms can actually weaken their accuracy and/or precision, leading many champions of ‘Big Data’ analytics to argue that ‘theory’ is not only unnecessary, but also undermines the ‘impartiality’ of AI and ‘deep learning’. This talk explains: why this proposition is only true when such techniques are used exclusively for prediction; and how embracing recent developments in the use of causal diagrams can harness the potential for context-sensitive theoretical knowledge to generate meaningful insights for causal inference and improve prediction.

The Importance of Context-sensitive, Theory-driven Analyses for Causal Inference (and Prediction)

George Ellison, Leeds Institute for Data Analytics – University of Leeds
Contributors: Peter Tennant and Mark Gilthorpe 16:20 – 16:40

In the excitement surrounding AI and ‘deep learning’ it is easy to lose sight of what machine-led algorithmic approaches to (‘Big’) data analytics can and can’t do. These approaches can help us prepare for (and, occasionally, prevent) future events based on ‘postdiction’ – i.e. predictions based on the modelling of past events. However, ‘postdiction’ can’t help us prepare for the future if the contexts/circumstances differ from those in the past; and it can’t help us prevent future events if our interventions alter the contexts and/or circumstances on which its predictions depend (as occurs when our interventions are designed to alter one or more of the predictor variables). Such designs are commonplace within applied data analytics – where predictors are routinely mistaken for (likely) causes – even though the mathematical processes underpinning algorithmic prediction mean that non-causal variables are often more powerful predictors than those that are genuine causes (and where genuine causes are often selected out of predictive models to ‘improve’ model fit). Under these circumstances, ‘theory’-driven inclusion of known causes in predictive algorithms can actually weaken their accuracy and/or precision, leading many champions of ‘Big Data’ analytics to argue that ‘theory’ is not only unnecessary, but also undermines the ‘impartiality’ of AI and ‘deep learning’. This talk explains: why this proposition is only true when such techniques are used exclusively for prediction; and how embracing recent developments in the use of causal diagrams can harness the potential for context-sensitive theoretical knowledge to generate meaningful insights for causal inference and improve prediction.

Day 1: LIGHTNING
Day 1: LIGHTNING
Simulcast of Impact Stage
09:40 – 10:30

09:40 – 10:30

Intro to Lightning Stage
10:30 – 10:40

10:30 – 10:40

Helene Guillaume, WILD
10:40 – 10:50

10:40 – 10:50

Michael Levin, Yandex
10:50 – 11:00

10:50 – 11:00

Craig Parfitt, GFT
11:00 – 11:10

11:00 – 11:10

Aaron Jones, See Fashion
11:10 – 11:20

11:10 – 11:20

Marton Gaspar, The Quarry
11:20 – 11:30

11:20 – 11:30

Nick Schweitzer, Klydo
11:30 – 11:40

11:30 – 11:40

Break
11:40 – 12:00

11:40 – 12:00

Peter Ohnemus, Dacadoo
12:00 – 12:20

12:00 – 12:20

Jack Miller, Chattermill
12:20 – 12:30

12:20 – 12:30

Mads Holmen, Bibblio
12:30 – 12:40

12:30 – 12:40

Ross Harper, Limbic
12:40 – 12:50

12:40 – 12:50

Rob Munro, Figure Eight
12:50 – 13:00

12:50 – 13:00

Lunch
13:00 – 14:00

13:00 – 14:00

Andrew Bruce, PROGRAMMIS
14:00 – 14:10

14:00 – 14:10

Piotr Surma, APPLICA.AI
14:10 – 14:20

14:10 – 14:20

Nickolai Vysokov, BrainPatch
14:20 – 14:30

14:20 – 14:30

Dr Kiki Leutner, MindX
14:30 – 14:40

14:30 – 14:40

Marco Marchesi, Happy Finish
14:40 – 14:50

14:40 – 14:50

FlashCards (Teens from Acorn Aspirations)
14:50 – 15:00

14:50 – 15:00

Hablar (Teens from AI Hack)
15:00 – 15:10

15:00 – 15:10

FootPrint (Teens from AI Hack)
15:10 – 15:20

15:10 – 15:20

Frank Reeves, Avvio
15:20 – 15:30

15:20 – 15:30

Break
15:30 – 16:00

15:30 – 16:00

Max Knupfer, EVA by LUCKYLINK
16:00 – 16:10

16:00 – 16:10

Stephen Mackintosh, RE:INFER
16:10 – 16:20

16:10 – 16:20

Stephen Mackintosh, RE:INFER
16:10 – 16:20

16:10 – 16:20

Stephen Mackintosh, RE:INFER
16:10 – 16:20

16:10 – 16:20

Piotr Mirowski, HumanMachine
16:20 – 16:40

16:20 – 16:40

Danica Damljanovic, Sentient Machines
16:40 – 16:50

16:40 – 16:50

Day 1: IMPACT
Day 1: CUTTING EDGE
Day 1: ETHICS
Day 1: LAB TO LIVE
Day 1: BLOCKCHAIN
Day 1: TURING RESEARCH
Day 1: LIGHTNING

Day 2 – Tuesday 12th June

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Day 2: IMPACT
Day 2: IMPACT
Welcome to Day 2
Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Richard Muirhead, Founder, Fabric Ventures
Dan Murray, Co Founder of Mobula & Grabble, and Host of the Secret Leaders Podcast
08:30 – 08:50

Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX
Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Richard Muirhead, Founder, Fabric Ventures
Dan Murray, Co Founder of Mobula & Grabble, and Host of the Secret Leaders Podcast
08:30 – 08:50

Opening Remarks
Esther Dyson, Founder, HICCup/Way to Wellville in conversation with Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
08:50 – 09:10

Esther Dyson, Founder, HICCup/Way to Wellville in conversation with Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
08:50 – 09:10

The Journey So Far
Hermann Hauser, Founder of ARM, Founder and Director of Amadeus Capital, Investor in 100+ tech startups, Godfather of venture capital in the UK
09:10 – 09:30

Hermann Hauser, Founder of ARM, Founder and Director of Amadeus Capital, Investor in 100+ tech startups, Godfather of venture capital in the UK
09:10 – 09:30

Rene Haas, President of IP Products Group, ARM
in conversation with John Thornhill, Innovation Editor, Financial Times
09:30 – 09:50

in conversation with John Thornhill, Innovation Editor, Financial Times
09:30 – 09:50

Towards Genome-Scale Drug Design
Riccardo Sabatini, Chief Data Scientist, Orionis Sciences
09:50 – 10:10

Riccardo Sabatini, Chief Data Scientist, Orionis Sciences
09:50 – 10:10

Enterprise Augmented Intelligence in Financial Services
Manoj Saxena, Executive Chairman, CognitiveScale (and former General Manager of IBM Watson)
Akshaya Bhargava, Executive Chairman, Bridgeweave (and Former CEO of Barclays Wealth and Investment Management)
Lori Beer, Global CIO, JP Morgan Chase & Co.
10:10 – 10:50

Artificial Intelligence has helped push the envelope of technology innovation and advancement in the financial industry. There are plenty of bankers talking up the potential for AI to revolutionise an industry that has struggled with profitability in the decade since the financial crisis. And virtually every large consultancy has written research papers or built practices around AI and the transformation of the banking sector, across multiple business areas.

While banks are experimenting with AI across their businesses, investments, and strategies vary wildly. This session will focus on clarifying the hype vs the reality, and will delve into real world use cases and the state of Enterprise Augmented Intelligence.

Come join these industry luminaries in a fascinating and lively discussion on Augmented Intelligence, the potential for disruption, and the building blocks for getting it done correctly. AI-enabled process transformations are driving efficiency, consistency, speed, new business models, and better outcomes. Long term, harnessing the power of AI to automate and manage intelligent processes, with explainability, will separate the winners from the losers.

Manoj Saxena, Executive Chairman, CognitiveScale (and former General Manager of IBM Watson)
Akshaya Bhargava, Executive Chairman, Bridgeweave (and Former CEO of Barclays Wealth and Investment Management)
Lori Beer, Global CIO, JP Morgan Chase & Co.
10:10 – 10:50

Artificial Intelligence has helped push the envelope of technology innovation and advancement in the financial industry. There are plenty of bankers talking up the potential for AI to revolutionise an industry that has struggled with profitability in the decade since the financial crisis. And virtually every large consultancy has written research papers or built practices around AI and the transformation of the banking sector, across multiple business areas.

While banks are experimenting with AI across their businesses, investments, and strategies vary wildly. This session will focus on clarifying the hype vs the reality, and will delve into real world use cases and the state of Enterprise Augmented Intelligence.

Come join these industry luminaries in a fascinating and lively discussion on Augmented Intelligence, the potential for disruption, and the building blocks for getting it done correctly. AI-enabled process transformations are driving efficiency, consistency, speed, new business models, and better outcomes. Long term, harnessing the power of AI to automate and manage intelligent processes, with explainability, will separate the winners from the losers.

Will an AI be your next Chief Marketing Officer?
Wes Nichols, Board Partner, Upfront Ventures
10:50 – 11:10

Wes Nichols, Board Partner, Upfront Ventures
10:50 – 11:10

Impact of AI on Cyber Security: A Real Opportunity?
Hosted by Alex Van Someren, Managing Partner, Amadeus Capital Partners
Matthew Gould MBE, Director General for Digital and Media Policy, Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Angela Sasse, Professor of Human-Centred Technology in the Department of Computer Science, University College London
Cath Goulding, Head of IT Security, Nominet
Dave Atkinson, CEO, Senseon.io
11:10 – 11:50

Hosted by Alex Van Someren, Managing Partner, Amadeus Capital Partners
Matthew Gould MBE, Director General for Digital and Media Policy, Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Angela Sasse, Professor of Human-Centred Technology in the Department of Computer Science, University College London
Cath Goulding, Head of IT Security, Nominet
Dave Atkinson, CEO, Senseon.io
11:10 – 11:50

Winners of the 2018 CyberFirst Girls Competition
Jess Peck, Megan Pickup, Zara Pristov-King and Callena Wylie from The Piggott School
11:50 – 12:10

Jess Peck, Megan Pickup, Zara Pristov-King and Callena Wylie from The Piggott School
11:50 – 12:10

Investing in AI – Seed to Series C
Hosted by Antoine Blondeau, Co-Founder & Chairman of Sentient and Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Alpha Intelligence Capital
Dharmash Mistry, General Partner, Lakestar
Siraj Khaliq, Investment Partner, Atomico
Roy Bahat, Head, Bloomberg Beta
Luciana Lixandru, Partner, Accel
12:10 – 12:50


Where will the next opportunities be and is the timing right?
How many exits are early trade sales versus unicorn IPOs?
What kind of investment strategy makes sense?
Is it advisable to get exposure to AI via the public or private market?
How do you know when to invest – at what stage should you go into an AI startup and how long until you might see a return?
Will the startups survive the Tech Giant monopoly?

Hosted by Antoine Blondeau, Co-Founder & Chairman of Sentient and Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Alpha Intelligence Capital
Dharmash Mistry, General Partner, Lakestar
Siraj Khaliq, Investment Partner, Atomico
Roy Bahat, Head, Bloomberg Beta
Luciana Lixandru, Partner, Accel
12:10 – 12:50


Where will the next opportunities be and is the timing right?
How many exits are early trade sales versus unicorn IPOs?
What kind of investment strategy makes sense?
Is it advisable to get exposure to AI via the public or private market?
How do you know when to invest – at what stage should you go into an AI startup and how long until you might see a return?
Will the startups survive the Tech Giant monopoly?

The Role of AI in Returning to the Moon
James Parr, FDL Director, NASA Frontier Development Lab
12:50 – 13:10

With the 50th Anniversary of the race to the Moon just a year away, this talk will provide an overview of NASA’s renewed plans to return to the lunar environment and how the Frontier Development Lab is using AI to build tools to support this goal. The talk will showcase a lunar mapping AI developed to support lunar exploration and how citizen scientists are supporting by training the algorithm.

James Parr, FDL Director, NASA Frontier Development Lab
12:50 – 13:10

With the 50th Anniversary of the race to the Moon just a year away, this talk will provide an overview of NASA’s renewed plans to return to the lunar environment and how the Frontier Development Lab is using AI to build tools to support this goal. The talk will showcase a lunar mapping AI developed to support lunar exploration and how citizen scientists are supporting by training the algorithm.

LUNCH
13:10 – 13:30

13:10 – 13:30

Launch of the Mayor of London's AI Report
Rajesh Agrawal, Deputy Mayor of London for Business
13:30 – 13:40

Rajesh Agrawal, Deputy Mayor of London for Business
13:30 – 13:40

Tech Nation 2018 report and AI
Gerard Grech, Chief Executive at Tech Nation
13:40 – 13:50

Gerard Grech, Chief Executive at Tech Nation
13:40 – 13:50

The UK Government's Industrial Strategy and AI Grand Challenge
Hosted by Priya Guha, Ecosystem General Manager, RocketSpace
Gila Sacks, Director, Digital and Tech Policy at the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Dr Rannia Leontaridi OBE, Director, Business Growth, Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy
13:50 – 14:10

Hosted by Priya Guha, Ecosystem General Manager, RocketSpace
Gila Sacks, Director, Digital and Tech Policy at the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Dr Rannia Leontaridi OBE, Director, Business Growth, Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy
13:50 – 14:10

AI and Smart Cities
Hosted by Dan McCrum, Alphaville Editor, Financial Times
Theo Blackwell, Chief Digital Officer, London
Lauren Sager Weinstein, CDO, TFL
Will Cavendish, Global Lead, Digital Services, Arup
James Dean, CEO and Founder, SenSat
14:10 – 14:50

Hosted by Dan McCrum, Alphaville Editor, Financial Times
Theo Blackwell, Chief Digital Officer, London
Lauren Sager Weinstein, CDO, TFL
Will Cavendish, Global Lead, Digital Services, Arup
James Dean, CEO and Founder, SenSat
14:10 – 14:50

How AI Is Shaping How We Think About Space
Shiva Rajaraman, Chief Product Officer, WeWork in conversation with Victoria Turk, Senior Editor, WIRED UK
14:50 – 15:10

Shiva Rajaraman, Chief Product Officer, WeWork in conversation with Victoria Turk, Senior Editor, WIRED UK
14:50 – 15:10

The Autonomy Ecosystem – Impact of Self-Driving Cars on Everything from Regulation to Retail
Frank Chen, Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
15:10 – 15:30

Frank Chen, Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
15:10 – 15:30

Future of Mobility
Lucas Di Grassi, CEO, Roborace
15:30 – 15:50

Lucas Di Grassi, CEO, Roborace
15:30 – 15:50

Impact on Mobility
Hosted by Nicki Shields, Reporter, Formula E Pit Lane
Frank Chen, Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
Lucas Di Grassi, CEO, Roborace
Michael Ronen, Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisers
David Thevenon, Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisers
Kirsty Lloyd-Jukes, CEO, Morpheus Labs
15:50 – 16:30

Hosted by Nicki Shields, Reporter, Formula E Pit Lane
Frank Chen, Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
Lucas Di Grassi, CEO, Roborace
Michael Ronen, Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisers
David Thevenon, Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisers
Kirsty Lloyd-Jukes, CEO, Morpheus Labs
15:50 – 16:30

The China Perspective
Jeffery Ding, D.Phil Researcher, Oxford University Governance of AI Program in conversation with Caroline Daniel, Partner, Brunswick Group
16:30 – 16:50

Jeffery Ding, D.Phil Researcher, Oxford University Governance of AI Program in conversation with Caroline Daniel, Partner, Brunswick Group
16:30 – 16:50

How Do We Equip People for the Future and Re-skill the Workforce?
Hosted by Phil Smith, Chairman, Innovate UK
Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
Shiva Rajaraman, Chief Product Officer, WeWork
Baroness Joanna Shields, CEO, BenevolentAI
Liz Ericson, Partner, McKinsey
Deep Nishar, Senior Managing Partner SoftBank Investment Advisers
16:50 – 17:30

If two thirds of the workforce of 2030 have already left the education system, how do we go about the radical and urgent re-skilling of the existing workforce. When companies or countries want to remain competitive in the next generation, how do they go about building and maintaining the right talent? In this session we will examine what some of the challenges of the next generation workforce will be. How do we start to prepare for that now, as individuals, as organisations and as nations. What skills will we require and what will the shape of the future workforce be?

Q. Are the pieces in place which allow us to build, let alone define the workforce of the next 20-30 years
Q. Are there leaders, examples of best practice
Q. Government policy (In the UK at least) has tended to be very fragmented in this area how do we address that
Q. What are the steps that every individual, organisation and nation should do now ?
Q. What jobs to you recommend to your children ?
Q What jobs would you suggest for your colleagues, parents etc to retrain for ?
Q. How do we manage a workforce of humans and AIs ?
Q. Do we need a radical re-think about education ?”

Hosted by Phil Smith, Chairman, Innovate UK
Kathryn Parsons, CEO, Decoded
Shiva Rajaraman, Chief Product Officer, WeWork
Baroness Joanna Shields, CEO, BenevolentAI
Liz Ericson, Partner, McKinsey
Deep Nishar, Senior Managing Partner SoftBank Investment Advisers
16:50 – 17:30

If two thirds of the workforce of 2030 have already left the education system, how do we go about the radical and urgent re-skilling of the existing workforce. When companies or countries want to remain competitive in the next generation, how do they go about building and maintaining the right talent? In this session we will examine what some of the challenges of the next generation workforce will be. How do we start to prepare for that now, as individuals, as organisations and as nations. What skills will we require and what will the shape of the future workforce be?

Q. Are the pieces in place which allow us to build, let alone define the workforce of the next 20-30 years
Q. Are there leaders, examples of best practice
Q. Government policy (In the UK at least) has tended to be very fragmented in this area how do we address that
Q. What are the steps that every individual, organisation and nation should do now ?
Q. What jobs to you recommend to your children ?
Q What jobs would you suggest for your colleagues, parents etc to retrain for ?
Q. How do we manage a workforce of humans and AIs ?
Q. Do we need a radical re-think about education ?”

Closing Remarks
Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX

Charlie Muirhead, CEO and Founder, CognitionX
Tabitha Goldstaub, Co-Founder, CognitionX

Day 2: CUTTING EDGE
Day 2: CUTTING EDGE
Introduction to the Day
Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View and Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
09:00 – 09:10

Azeem Azhar, Founder of Exponential View and Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
09:00 – 09:10

The Power of Machine Learning and Design Thinking
Haiyan Zhang, Innovation Director at Microsoft Research Cambridge
09:10 – 09:30

Haiyan Zhang, Innovation Director at Microsoft Research Cambridge
09:10 – 09:30

The Future of Decision-Making
Vishal Chatrath, CEO & Co-Founder, PROWLER.io
09:30 – 09:50

Vishal Chatrath, CEO & Co-Founder, PROWLER.io
09:30 – 09:50

Bringing Inclusive Financial Services to the World
Dr. Yuan (Alan) Qi, VP and Chief Data Scientist, Ant Financial Services Group
09:50 – 10:10

Dr. Yuan (Alan) Qi, VP and Chief Data Scientist, Ant Financial Services Group
09:50 – 10:10

Safety and Accountability in Learned Systems
Sarah Gold, Founder, Projects by IF
10:10 – 10:20

Sarah Gold, Founder, Projects by IF
10:10 – 10:20

Hard vs. Easy Problems in Machine Automation
Alex Caccia, CEO, Animal Dynamics
10:20 – 10:30

Alex Caccia, CEO, Animal Dynamics
10:20 – 10:30

Engineering Swarms
Sabine Hauert, Assistant Professor, University of Bristol, President and Co-Founder, Robohub.org
10:30 – 10:40

Sabine Hauert, Assistant Professor, University of Bristol, President and Co-Founder, Robohub.org
10:30 – 10:40

Robotic Solutions That Scale
David Pinn, VP of Strategy, Brain Corp
10:40 – 10:50

– Vertical integration in robotics is hard because commercial success requires expertise in AI, navigation, application-specific development, sales, support, etc
– Partnering is vital: Brain Corp relies on established equipment makers to provide their domain-specific technical expertise and broad sales and support networks
– Brain Corp partners with robotics startups, allowing them to focus on their application-specific expertise and not worry about generic navigation challenges
– To expand commercial robotics into non-industrial applications they should drop-in without the need for training or changes to the environment

David Pinn, VP of Strategy, Brain Corp
10:40 – 10:50

– Vertical integration in robotics is hard because commercial success requires expertise in AI, navigation, application-specific development, sales, support, etc
– Partnering is vital: Brain Corp relies on established equipment makers to provide their domain-specific technical expertise and broad sales and support networks
– Brain Corp partners with robotics startups, allowing them to focus on their application-specific expertise and not worry about generic navigation challenges
– To expand commercial robotics into non-industrial applications they should drop-in without the need for training or changes to the environment

Autonomous Machines Panel
Hosted by Kenneth Cukier, Senior Editor, The Economist
Alex Caccia, CEO, Animal Dynamics
Sabine Hauert, Assistant Professor University of Bristol, President and Co-founder Robohub.org
David Pinn, VP of Strategy, Brain Corp
10:50 – 11:10

Hosted by Kenneth Cukier, Senior Editor, The Economist
Alex Caccia, CEO, Animal Dynamics
Sabine Hauert, Assistant Professor University of Bristol, President and Co-founder Robohub.org
David Pinn, VP of Strategy, Brain Corp
10:50 – 11:10

Closing the Intelligence Gap
Sean Gourley, Founder of PrimerAI
11:10 – 11:30

Sean Gourley, Founder of PrimerAI
11:10 – 11:30

Mapping the Real World
Jan Erik Solem, CEO, Mappilary
11:30 – 11:40

Jan Erik Solem, CEO, Mappilary
11:30 – 11:40

Changing How the World Moves
Georg Polzer, CEO, Teralytics
11:40 – 11:50

Georg Polzer, CEO, Teralytics
11:40 – 11:50

Mapping the World to Build Smart Cities
Hosted by Dr Larissa Suzuki, Honorary Research Associate, University College London
Jan Erik Solem, CEO, Mappilary
Georg Polzer, CEO, Teralytics
11:50 – 12:10

Hosted by Dr Larissa Suzuki, Honorary Research Associate, University College London
Jan Erik Solem, CEO, Mappilary
Georg Polzer, CEO, Teralytics
11:50 – 12:10

Machine Learning and New Radical Empirism
Zavain Dar, Principal, Lux Capital
12:10 – 12:30

Zavain Dar, Principal, Lux Capital
12:10 – 12:30

Investing in Very Deep Tech Panel
Hosted by Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Zavain Dar, Principal, Lux Capital
Leila Zegna, Founding Partner, Kindred Capital
Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
12:30 – 12:50

Hosted by Azeem Azhar, Founder, Exponential View
Zavain Dar, Principal, Lux Capital
Leila Zegna, Founding Partner, Kindred Capital
Carina Namih, Partner, Episode1 Ventures
12:30 – 12:50

LUNCH
12:50 – 13:10

12:50 – 13:10

Centaurs or Butlers? Designing for Human Relationships with Non-Human Intelligences
Matt Jones, Principal Designer, Google AI
13:10 – 13:20

Matt Jones, Principal Designer, Google AI
13:10 – 13:20

Democratising Science with AI
Vivian Chan, Co-Founder and CEO Sparrho
13:20 – 13:40

Vivian Chan, Co-Founder and CEO Sparrho
13:20 – 13:40

Radical Empiricism and Technology Enabling Translational Biology at Scale
Chris Gibson, CEO Recursion Pharmaceuticals
13:40 – 13:50

Chris Gibson, CEO Recursion Pharmaceuticals
13:40 – 13:50

Going Beyond The Bounds of Human Intuition
Shiva Amiri, Director of Data Science, Zymergen
13:50 – 14:00

Shiva Amiri, Director of Data Science, Zymergen
13:50 – 14:00

Harnessing Evolution with AI
James Field, Founder, LabGenius
14:00 – 14:10

James Field, Founder, LabGenius
14:00 – 14:10

Biochemistry Meets AI Panel
Hosted by Leila Zegna, Founding Partner, Kindred Capital
Chris Gibson, CEO Recursion Pharmaceuticals
Shiva Amiri, Director of Data Science, Zymergen
James Field, Founder, LabGenius
14:10 – 14:30

Hosted by Leila Zegna, Founding Partner, Kindred Capital
Chris Gibson, CEO Recursion Pharmaceuticals
Shiva Amiri, Director of Data Science, Zymergen
James Field, Founder, LabGenius
14:10 – 14:30

Directed Protein Evolution – an AI perspective
Kamil Tamiola, CEO, Peptone
14:30 – 14:40

Kamil Tamiola, CEO, Peptone
14:30 – 14:40

Transforming Drug Discovery Through Interdisciplinary Innovation
Noor Shaker, CEO, GTN
14:40 – 14:50

Noor Shaker, CEO, GTN
14:40 – 14:50

Empowering the Quantum Revolution
Dr Julie Love, Quantum Computing Business Development, Microsoft
14:50 – 15:10

Dr Julie Love, Quantum Computing Business Development, Microsoft
14:50 – 15:10

The Future Impact of AI on Cyber Crime
Dave Palmer, Director of Technology, Darktrace
15:10 – 15:30

In the coming era of widespread automation, self-learning machines, and interactive AI, there will be many changes to our relationships with the internet and cybersecurity. But digital criminals can significantly benefit from AI automation too. This session will explore some of the most interesting applications of AI likely to emerge from digital criminals and the reasons why they will choose them.

Dave Palmer, Director of Technology, Darktrace
15:10 – 15:30

In the coming era of widespread automation, self-learning machines, and interactive AI, there will be many changes to our relationships with the internet and cybersecurity. But digital criminals can significantly benefit from AI automation too. This session will explore some of the most interesting applications of AI likely to emerge from digital criminals and the reasons why they will choose them.

How to Defend Against Automated Cyber Attacks
Robert Hercock, Chief Research Scientist, BT Security Research Practice
15:30 – 15:40

Robert Hercock, Chief Research Scientist, BT Security Research Practice
15:30 – 15:40

The Next Wave of Interstate Cyber Conflicts
Mariarosaria Taddeo, Deputy Director, Digital Ethics Lab, University of Oxford. Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
15:40 – 15:50

Mariarosaria Taddeo, Deputy Director, Digital Ethics Lab, University of Oxford. Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
15:40 – 15:50

Cyber Security in the Age of AI
Panel host by Stephanie Hare, Researcher
Dave Palmer, Director of Technology, Darktrace
Robert Hercock, Chief Research Scientist, BT Security Research Practice
Mariarosaria Taddeo, Deputy Director, Digital Ethics Lab, University of Oxford. Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
15:50 – 16:10

Panel host by Stephanie Hare, Researcher
Dave Palmer, Director of Technology, Darktrace
Robert Hercock, Chief Research Scientist, BT Security Research Practice
Mariarosaria Taddeo, Deputy Director, Digital Ethics Lab, University of Oxford. Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
15:50 – 16:10

Ethics of Brain-Computer Interfaces
Karina Vold, Philosopher & Research Fellow, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
16:10 – 16:20

Karina Vold, Philosopher & Research Fellow, Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, University of Cambridge
16:10 – 16:20

Being a Beast Machine: Consciousness, AI, and Life
Anil Seth, Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience and Co-Director, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex
16:30 – 16:50

Anil Seth, Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience and Co-Director, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex
16:30 – 16:50

Day 2: ETHICS
Day 2: ETHICS
Forensic Architecture
Eyal Weizman, Director, Forensic Architecture & Professor of Spatial and Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London
09:10 – 09:30

Eyal Weizman, Director, Forensic Architecture & Professor of Spatial and Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London
09:10 – 09:30

Too Crazy to Fail? A Bold Vision for the Future of Data Governance
Jonnie Penn, New York Times Bestselling author, Google Technology Policy Fellow, and Rausing, Williamson and Lipton Trust doctoral scholar, University of Cambridge
09:30 – 09:50

For more than 60-years, the field of Artificial Intelligence has been driven by audacious goals. Funding for the initial conference in 1956 that gave AI its name was cut in half for that very reason; the event’s backers doubted that the undertaking would succeed. AI has since grown through booms and busts with its high ambitions intact. Now, as governments, business leaders, and academics around the globe scratch their heads over how best to responsibly manage the peculiar opportunities and risks made increasingly real by machine learning and other areas of AI research, we convene a meeting to discuss equally radical solutions for the future of data-governance. This panel assembles up-and-coming researchers from Harvard, UCL, and the University of Cambridge to assess the diverse technological, legal, and historical precedents for why we must (…once again) dream big.

Jonnie Penn, New York Times Bestselling author, Google Technology Policy Fellow, and Rausing, Williamson and Lipton Trust doctoral scholar, University of Cambridge
09:30 – 09:50

For more than 60-years, the field of Artificial Intelligence has been driven by audacious goals. Funding for the initial conference in 1956 that gave AI its name was cut in half for that very reason; the event’s backers doubted that the undertaking would succeed. AI has since grown through booms and busts with its high ambitions intact. Now, as governments, business leaders, and academics around the globe scratch their heads over how best to responsibly manage the peculiar opportunities and risks made increasingly real by machine learning and other areas of AI research, we convene a meeting to discuss equally radical solutions for the future of data-governance. This panel assembles up-and-coming researchers from Harvard, UCL, and the University of Cambridge to assess the diverse technological, legal, and historical precedents for why we must (…once again) dream big.

Too Crazy to Fail? A Bold Vision for the Future of Data Governance
Panel hosted by Jonnie Penn, New York Times Bestselling Author, Google Technology Policy Fellow, and Rausing, Williamson and Lipton Trust Doctoral Scholar, University of Cambridge
Ravi Naik, Partner, ITN Solicitors
Michael Veale, Doctoral Researcher, UCL
Salome Viljoen, Fellow in the Privacy Initiatives Project at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
Keith Porcaro, Fellow, Berkman Klein Center, Harvard University
Stephanie Hare, Researcher
09:50 – 10:50

Panel hosted by Jonnie Penn, New York Times Bestselling Author, Google Technology Policy Fellow, and Rausing, Williamson and Lipton Trust Doctoral Scholar, University of Cambridge
Ravi Naik, Partner, ITN Solicitors
Michael Veale, Doctoral Researcher, UCL
Salome Viljoen, Fellow in the Privacy Initiatives Project at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society
Keith Porcaro, Fellow, Berkman Klein Center, Harvard University
Stephanie Hare, Researcher
09:50 – 10:50

Lightning pitches – A showcase of Privacy Enhancing Technologies
Jonathan Holtby, Hub of All Things
Harry Keen, Co-Founder and CEO, Hazy
10:50 – 11:10

Jonathan Holtby, Hub of All Things
Harry Keen, Co-Founder and CEO, Hazy
10:50 – 11:10

The Lords Review: A Magna Carta for the Digital Age? Do We Need an Ethical Code for AI?
Tim Clement-Jones, Chair, Lords Artificial Intelligence Select Committee in conversation with Baroness Olly Grender, Member of the Artificial Intelligence Committee

Followed by Q&A with Rob McCargow, AI Programme Lead, PwC
11:10 – 11:50

Tim Clement-Jones, Chair, Lords Artificial Intelligence Select Committee in conversation with Baroness Olly Grender, Member of the Artificial Intelligence Committee

Followed by Q&A with Rob McCargow, AI Programme Lead, PwC
11:10 – 11:50

When Bias in Product Design Means Life or Death
Carol Reiley, Board Member, Drive.ai
11:50 – 12:10

Carol Reiley, Board Member, Drive.ai
11:50 – 12:10

Ethical AI
Rumman Chowdhury, Global Lead, Responsible AI, Accenture in conversation with Hugo Pinto, Managing Partner UKI, Accenture Digital
12:10 – 12:30

Rumman Chowdhury, Global Lead, Responsible AI, Accenture in conversation with Hugo Pinto, Managing Partner UKI, Accenture Digital
12:10 – 12:30

LUNCH
12:30 – 12:50

12:30 – 12:50

The Urgency For More Human Education in an AI Future, Hosted by Big Change
Hosted by Essie North, MD, Big Change
Sir Anthony Seldon, Author, “The Fourth Education Revolution: How Artificial Intelligence is Changing the Face of Learning”
Priya Lakhani, CEO, Century Tech
Alexander Fefegha, Head of Creative Technology, Comuzi
Sherry Coutu CBE, Chair, Founders4Schools
12:50 – 13:30

Hosted by Essie North, MD, Big Change
Sir Anthony Seldon, Author, “The Fourth Education Revolution: How Artificial Intelligence is Changing the Face of Learning”
Priya Lakhani, CEO, Century Tech
Alexander Fefegha, Head of Creative Technology, Comuzi
Sherry Coutu CBE, Chair, Founders4Schools
12:50 – 13:30

General Counsel Perspectives
Hosted by Caroline Daniel, Partner, Brunswick Group
Carolyn Herzog, General Counsel, ARM
Chris Fowler, General Counsel TSO & COO, Governance and Compliance, BT Legal
Claire Bennett, Partner, DLA Piper
Anthony Kenny, Assistant General Counsel Corporate and CBS, ‎GSK
13:30 – 14:10

1) Biased decision-making
2) Data disclosure – who is making the decisions. When should a company tell consumers that a machine is making a decision about their life? When does a company look irresponsible in this area?
3) Who is responsible in an organisation for thinking ahead about these issues? How to get ahead of the problems: There is a lot of talk about software engineers needing to do ethics courses, but where should the ethical responsibility for outcomes of a corporate use of AI, sit in the organisation? What is the role for general counsels in this. Are ethics boards a good idea? Who is doing this well?
4) Are you using AI in your own legal department? Eg in saving time on reading through extensive legal documentation? How far could AI enable you to do far more in house, that you previously outsourced to law companies to review.
5) If you can’t talk about specific legal challenges within your organisation to bring AI to life, what is a great example in the outside world you have seen that directly brought together a challenging issue of ethics and the law.
6) The black box idea of AI. The House of Lords select committee report noted that “companies and organisations need to improve the intelligibility of their AI systems. Without this, regulators may need to step in and prohibit the use of opaque technology.”
7) Geopolitics around AI is changing the debate too

Hosted by Caroline Daniel, Partner, Brunswick Group
Carolyn Herzog, General Counsel, ARM
Chris Fowler, General Counsel TSO & COO, Governance and Compliance, BT Legal
Claire Bennett, Partner, DLA Piper
Anthony Kenny, Assistant General Counsel Corporate and CBS, ‎GSK
13:30 – 14:10

1) Biased decision-making
2) Data disclosure – who is making the decisions. When should a company tell consumers that a machine is making a decision about their life? When does a company look irresponsible in this area?
3) Who is responsible in an organisation for thinking ahead about these issues? How to get ahead of the problems: There is a lot of talk about software engineers needing to do ethics courses, but where should the ethical responsibility for outcomes of a corporate use of AI, sit in the organisation? What is the role for general counsels in this. Are ethics boards a good idea? Who is doing this well?
4) Are you using AI in your own legal department? Eg in saving time on reading through extensive legal documentation? How far could AI enable you to do far more in house, that you previously outsourced to law companies to review.
5) If you can’t talk about specific legal challenges within your organisation to bring AI to life, what is a great example in the outside world you have seen that directly brought together a challenging issue of ethics and the law.
6) The black box idea of AI. The House of Lords select committee report noted that “companies and organisations need to improve the intelligibility of their AI systems. Without this, regulators may need to step in and prohibit the use of opaque technology.”
7) Geopolitics around AI is changing the debate too

How to be Naturally Intelligent about Artificial Intelligence
Professor AC Grayling, Philosopher, Author and Master, New College of the Humanities
14:10 – 14:50

Professor AC Grayling, Philosopher, Author and Master, New College of the Humanities
14:10 – 14:50

Sex Robots: The Truth Behind The Headlines
Kate Devlin, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing at Goldsmiths
14:50 – 15:10

Kate Devlin, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computing at Goldsmiths
14:50 – 15:10

Patrick Nyirishema, Director General, Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Authority
in conversation with Kay Firth-Butterfield, Head of AI and ML, World Economic Forum
15:10 – 15:30

in conversation with Kay Firth-Butterfield, Head of AI and ML, World Economic Forum
15:10 – 15:30

How The AI Community Could Put a Stop to Homelessness
Andrew Funk, President, #HomelessEntrepreneur (#HE)
15:30 – 15:50

Andrew Funk, President, #HomelessEntrepreneur (#HE)
15:30 – 15:50

Using AI to Turbo Charge African Economies and Reduce Environmental Damage
Dr Pippa Malmgren, Founder, HRobotics
15:50 – 16:10

Dr Pippa Malmgren, Founder, HRobotics
15:50 – 16:10

How Can AI Have Increased Legitimacy for the Public?
Hosted by Imogen Parker, Head of Justice, Rights & Digital Society, Nuffield Foundation
Tim Hughes , Director, Involve
Natalie Banner , ‘Understanding Patient Data’ Lead, Wellcome Trust
Hilary Sutcliffe , Director, SocietyInside
Brhmie Balaram, Senior Researcher, RSA
16:10 – 16:50

Trust and levels of public confidence in the use of, development and application of tech and AI have been eroded by several high-profile and recent scandals. This panel asks what kind of approaches to public engagement can help tech companies, policymakers and regulators build public legitimacy, as well as how we can build a sense of common good and a renewed settlement between citizens and those who develop technology. This panel will explore examples of diverse public engagement connecting public voices to technology, and ask how they can contribute to better development of AI, which is more in tune with and responsive to public and societal values and needs.

Hosted by Imogen Parker, Head of Justice, Rights & Digital Society, Nuffield Foundation
Tim Hughes , Director, Involve
Natalie Banner , ‘Understanding Patient Data’ Lead, Wellcome Trust
Hilary Sutcliffe , Director, SocietyInside
Brhmie Balaram, Senior Researcher, RSA
16:10 – 16:50

Trust and levels of public confidence in the use of, development and application of tech and AI have been eroded by several high-profile and recent scandals. This panel asks what kind of approaches to public engagement can help tech companies, policymakers and regulators build public legitimacy, as well as how we can build a sense of common good and a renewed settlement between citizens and those who develop technology. This panel will explore examples of diverse public engagement connecting public voices to technology, and ask how they can contribute to better development of AI, which is more in tune with and responsive to public and societal values and needs.

Friend or Foe – Impact of AI & Tech on Mental Health
Hosted by Sara Vaughan, Innovator, Creator of Brands with Purpose, Positive Change Maker
Minter Dial, Founder, Author and Filmmaker, Digitalproof Consultancy
Rod Banner, Agent of Change, 3LA and Founder of Joy Tech
Eve Critchley, Head of Digital, Mind
Ella Goldner, Co-Founder, Zinc
16:50 – 17:30

Hosted by Sara Vaughan, Innovator, Creator of Brands with Purpose, Positive Change Maker
Minter Dial, Founder, Author and Filmmaker, Digitalproof Consultancy
Rod Banner, Agent of Change, 3LA and Founder of Joy Tech
Eve Critchley, Head of Digital, Mind
Ella Goldner, Co-Founder, Zinc
16:50 – 17:30

Day 2: LAB TO LIVE
Day 2: LAB TO LIVE
Introduction to the Day
David Kelnar, Partner, MMC Ventures
09:10 – 09:30

David Kelnar, Partner, MMC Ventures
09:10 – 09:30

Bringing Humanity to AI: Emotional Intelligence and Diversity
Danny Guillory, Head of Diversity and Inclusion, Autodesk
Rachel Rekart, Director of Machine Assistance, Autodesk
09:30 – 09:50


Abstract:

Building the human factors of emotional intelligence and diversity into our AI is not only critical to customer retention, it also directly impacts the perception of our company and brand. If Autodesk truly wants to become a customer company, we will need to employ emotional intelligence in all of our interactions with customers, including our digital ones, and ensure that we design our interactions in ways that reflect the diversity of the societies in which we operate.

In the first half of the presentation, Rachael Cotton will explore the role of emotional intelligence in AVA, Autodesk Virtual Agent. Since launching over a year ago, AVA has become a major customer touchpoint and brand modality for Autodesk, speaking to over 100,000 customers per quarter. You’ll learn how the MASE team is striving to achieve emotionally intelligent customer experiences by injecting human-like attributes into AVA through persona, look and feel (avatar), and added “signal.”

Daniel Guillory will then discuss the importance of ensuring diversity and inclusion when developing AI and share tips on how to do so. You’ll learn the urgency of proactively incorporating diversity and inclusion in the development of AI and leave with a framework for analyzing the various dimensions of diversity in AI development from both a legal and ethical perspective, along with practical tips on how to ensure diversity in thought, staffing, and datasets.

Danny Guillory, Head of Diversity and Inclusion, Autodesk
Rachel Rekart, Director of Machine Assistance, Autodesk
09:30 – 09:50


Abstract:

Building the human factors of emotional intelligence and diversity into our AI is not only critical to customer retention, it also directly impacts the perception of our company and brand. If Autodesk truly wants to become a customer company, we will need to employ emotional intelligence in all of our interactions with customers, including our digital ones, and ensure that we design our interactions in ways that reflect the diversity of the societies in which we operate.

In the first half of the presentation, Rachael Cotton will explore the role of emotional intelligence in AVA, Autodesk Virtual Agent. Since launching over a year ago, AVA has become a major customer touchpoint and brand modality for Autodesk, speaking to over 100,000 customers per quarter. You’ll learn how the MASE team is striving to achieve emotionally intelligent customer experiences by injecting human-like attributes into AVA through persona, look and feel (avatar), and added “signal.”

Daniel Guillory will then discuss the importance of ensuring diversity and inclusion when developing AI and share tips on how to do so. You’ll learn the urgency of proactively incorporating diversity and inclusion in the development of AI and leave with a framework for analyzing the various dimensions of diversity in AI development from both a legal and ethical perspective, along with practical tips on how to ensure diversity in thought, staffing, and datasets.

Bits to Move Atoms: The Wide View of the Future of Mobility
Professor Paul Newman, Founder, Oxbotica (the first organisation with autonomous vehicles on UK roads) and BP Professor of Information Engineering, University of Oxford
09:50 – 10:10

Professor Paul Newman, Founder, Oxbotica (the first organisation with autonomous vehicles on UK roads) and BP Professor of Information Engineering, University of Oxford
09:50 – 10:10

How is the Legal Profession Adopting AI?
A Case study: Emily Foges, CEO, Luminance
A Case study: Gary Gallen, CEO, rradar
10:10 – 10:30

A Case study: Emily Foges, CEO, Luminance
A Case study: Gary Gallen, CEO, rradar
10:10 – 10:30

The Impact of AI on the Legal Industry
Hosted by James Kingston, Senior AI Researcher, CognitionX
Partha Mudgil, COO of Nakhoda, Linklaters
Emily Foges, CEO, Luminance
Gary Gallen, CEO, rradar
Nick West, Chief Technology Officer, Mishcon de Reya
10:30 – 11:10

Hosted by James Kingston, Senior AI Researcher, CognitionX
Partha Mudgil, COO of Nakhoda, Linklaters
Emily Foges, CEO, Luminance
Gary Gallen, CEO, rradar
Nick West, Chief Technology Officer, Mishcon de Reya
10:30 – 11:10

Pre-Primary Care: How AI Can Unlock Self-Care, The Biggest Opportunity in Healthcare
Hosted by Dr Jack Kreindler, Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Matteo Berlucchi, CEO and Co-Founder, Your.MD
Dr Claire Novorol, Co-Founder & Chief Medical Officer, Ada Health
Matthew Howard, Director, Deloitte AI
Dr Ali Parsa, CEO and Founder, Babylon Health
11:10 – 11:50

Hosted by Dr Jack Kreindler, Founder, Centre for Health and Human Performance
Matteo Berlucchi, CEO and Co-Founder, Your.MD
Dr Claire Novorol, Co-Founder & Chief Medical Officer, Ada Health
Matthew Howard, Director, Deloitte AI
Dr Ali Parsa, CEO and Founder, Babylon Health
11:10 – 11:50

AI for Counterterrorism
Dr Marc Warner, Founder and CEO, ASI
11:50 – 12:10

Dr Marc Warner, Founder and CEO, ASI
11:50 – 12:10

The Impact of AI on Insurance
Hosted by Lianna Brinded, Quartz
Ashish Umre, Head of AI, XL Catlin
Reza Khorshidi, Chief Scientist, AIG
Kim Nilsson, CEO and Co-Founder, Pivigo
Richard Hartley, CEO and Co-Founder, Cytora
12:10 – 12:50

Hosted by Lianna Brinded, Quartz
Ashish Umre, Head of AI, XL Catlin
Reza Khorshidi, Chief Scientist, AIG
Kim Nilsson, CEO and Co-Founder, Pivigo
Richard Hartley, CEO and Co-Founder, Cytora
12:10 – 12:50

LUNCH
12:50 – 13:30

12:50 – 13:30

AI in HR and Recruitment
Introduction by Ian Bailie, Head of AI HR Research, CognitionX
AI in HR and Recruitment – A Case Study
Mel Geekee, Strategy Director CHRO (Chief of Staff) & Global HR4HR Director, Unilever
Frida Polli, CEO, Pymetrics
13:30 – 13:50

Introduction by Ian Bailie, Head of AI HR Research, CognitionX
AI in HR and Recruitment – A Case Study
Mel Geekee, Strategy Director CHRO (Chief of Staff) & Global HR4HR Director, Unilever
Frida Polli, CEO, Pymetrics
13:30 – 13:50

AI in HR and Recruitment – A Case Study
Charna Parkey, VP of Customer Success Engineering, Textio
Emma John, Director Global Talent Acquisition Partner, ARM
13:50 – 14:10

Charna Parkey, VP of Customer Success Engineering, Textio
Emma John, Director Global Talent Acquisition Partner, ARM
13:50 – 14:10

The Impact of AI on HR and Recruitment
Hosted by Ian Bailie, Head of AI HR Research, CognitionX
Bernard Marr, Founder & CEO, Bernard Marr & Co.
Laszlo Bock, CEO, Humu (former S.V.P of People Operations, Google)
Mel Gee Kee, Strategy Director CHRO (Chief of Staff) & Global HR4HR Director, Unilever
14:10 – 14:50

Hosted by Ian Bailie, Head of AI HR Research, CognitionX
Bernard Marr, Founder & CEO, Bernard Marr & Co.
Laszlo Bock, CEO, Humu (former S.V.P of People Operations, Google)
Mel Gee Kee, Strategy Director CHRO (Chief of Staff) & Global HR4HR Director, Unilever
14:10 – 14:50

Getting AI Across the Chasm in the Enterprise
Jack Berkowitz, VP, Products and Data Science, Oracle
14:50 – 15:10

Jack Berkowitz, VP, Products and Data Science, Oracle
14:50 – 15:10

Pixels in, Joysticks Out
Scott Penberthy, Director Applied AI, Google
15:10 – 15:30

Scott Penberthy, Director Applied AI, Google
15:10 – 15:30

Botman vs SuperAgent: the Evolution of Customer Experience
Dr Nicola Millard, Head of Customer Insight, BT
15:30 – 15:50

Dr Nicola Millard, Head of Customer Insight, BT
15:30 – 15:50

How A Large Organisation Can Be Innovative with AI
Hosted by Brendan O’Rourke, CIO, Telefonica
Andy Day, former Chief Data Officer, Sainsbury’s (former Head of CRM, Telefonica)
Dr Nicola Millard, Head of Customer Insight, BT
15:50 – 16:30

Hosted by Brendan O’Rourke, CIO, Telefonica
Andy Day, former Chief Data Officer, Sainsbury’s (former Head of CRM, Telefonica)
Dr Nicola Millard, Head of Customer Insight, BT
15:50 – 16:30

AI the Threat or Cure for Media
Hosted by Mike Butcher, Editor-At-Large, Tech Crunch
Mads Holmen, Founder, Bibblio
Dan Gilbert, News UK
Grace Boswood, COO, Design and Engineering, BBC
16:30 – 16:50

Hosted by Mike Butcher, Editor-At-Large, Tech Crunch
Mads Holmen, Founder, Bibblio
Dan Gilbert, News UK
Grace Boswood, COO, Design and Engineering, BBC
16:30 – 16:50

Day 2: BLOCKCHAIN
Day 2: BLOCKCHAIN
The New World That Emerges When You Own Your Data
Keynote: Ryan Shea, Co-founder, Blockstack
09:10 – 09:30

Keynote: Ryan Shea, Co-founder, Blockstack
09:10 – 09:30

Building a Digital Identity on the Blockchain
Hosted by Ton van’t Noordende, CEO, 01 Ventures
Ryan Shea, Co-Founder, Blockstack
Melanie Shapiro, Founder & CEO, Token
Phil Chen, Advisor / Managing Partner, Horizons Ventures/ Presence Capital
09:30 – 10:10

Hosted by Ton van’t Noordende, CEO, 01 Ventures
Ryan Shea, Co-Founder, Blockstack
Melanie Shapiro, Founder & CEO, Token
Phil Chen, Advisor / Managing Partner, Horizons Ventures/ Presence Capital
09:30 – 10:10

IoT & the Connected Device Economy: a Token-Powered Disruption
Hosted by Christina Frankopan, Venture Partner, Fabric Ventures
Ekaterina Almasque, Managing Director, Samsung Catalyst Fund
Dimitri De Jonghe, Co-founder, Ocean Protocol
Carl Rodrigues, Partnerships Ambassador, Streamr
Julien Bouteloup, Founder, Flyingcarpet
10:10 – 11:10

Hosted by Christina Frankopan, Venture Partner, Fabric Ventures
Ekaterina Almasque, Managing Director, Samsung Catalyst Fund
Dimitri De Jonghe, Co-founder, Ocean Protocol
Carl Rodrigues, Partnerships Ambassador, Streamr
Julien Bouteloup, Founder, Flyingcarpet
10:10 – 11:10

Convergence of AI and Blockchain Technologies
Keynote: Mike Hearn, Core Platform Engineer, R3; Bitcoin Core Developer
11:10 – 11:30

Keynote: Mike Hearn, Core Platform Engineer, R3; Bitcoin Core Developer
11:10 – 11:30

Convergence of AI and Blockchain Technologies: Panel
Hosted by Lawrence Lundy-Bryan, Head of Research, Outlier Ventures
Mike Hearn, Core Platform Engineer, R3; Bitcoin Core Developer
Joshua Gans, Professor at the University of Toronto & Author of The “Disruption Dilemma”
Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist, Brave Software
Samantha Stein, Director of Startup Battlefield & Startup Battlefield Editor
11:30 – 12:10

Hosted by Lawrence Lundy-Bryan, Head of Research, Outlier Ventures
Mike Hearn, Core Platform Engineer, R3; Bitcoin Core Developer
Joshua Gans, Professor at the University of Toronto & Author of The “Disruption Dilemma”
Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist, Brave Software
Samantha Stein, Director of Startup Battlefield & Startup Battlefield Editor
11:30 – 12:10

The Brave Browser: Combining ML, Privacy, and Blockchain for Better Digital Advertising
Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist at Brave Software
12:10 – 12:30

Web browsing and digital advertising are broken, and everyone is paying the price. Users suffer invasive ads, tracking, malware. Publishers face huge losses in revenue. Advertisers experience massive fraud and poor targeting.

Brave aims to reset the system with a new blockchain-based digital advertising platform integrated with an Ethereum ERC20 utility token that can be exchanged between users, advertisers, and publishers. Users opt in and get paid to view fewer ads. Publishers earn more. And advertisers get better reporting and less fraud. To do this well, Brave advocates for client-side machine learning. This talk will cover some of the trade-offs of our approach.

Ben Livshits, Chief Scientist at Brave Software
12:10 – 12:30

Web browsing and digital advertising are broken, and everyone is paying the price. Users suffer invasive ads, tracking, malware. Publishers face huge losses in revenue. Advertisers experience massive fraud and poor targeting.

Brave aims to reset the system with a new blockchain-based digital advertising platform integrated with an Ethereum ERC20 utility token that can be exchanged between users, advertisers, and publishers. Users opt in and get paid to view fewer ads. Publishers earn more. And advertisers get better reporting and less fraud. To do this well, Brave advocates for client-side machine learning. This talk will cover some of the trade-offs of our approach.

LUNCH
12:30 – 13:30

12:30 – 13:30

The Sovereign Individual
Keynote: James Dale Davidson, Author, “The Sovereign Individual”
13:30 – 13:50

Keynote: James Dale Davidson, Author, “The Sovereign Individual”
13:30 – 13:50

Lightning Talks
13:50 – 14:50

13:50 – 14:50

Transforming Healthcare: The Case for Blockchain
Panel: Stefan Roever, Co-founder, AIKON
Kamal Obbad, Co-founder, Nebula Genomics
Lucy Ojomoko, Insilico Medicine
Nancy Fechnay, Founder, The Inspire Movement
14:50 – 15:50

Panel: Stefan Roever, Co-founder, AIKON
Kamal Obbad, Co-founder, Nebula Genomics
Lucy Ojomoko, Insilico Medicine
Nancy Fechnay, Founder, The Inspire Movement
14:50 – 15:50

Special Guest

15:50 – 16:10


15:50 – 16:10

Investing in a New Asset Class
Hosted by David Fauchier, Co-founder, Decusis Capital
Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
Meltem Demirors, Chief Strategy Officer, CoinShares
Travis Scher, Vice President, Investments, DCG
Charlie Noyes, Principal, Pantera Capital
16:10 – 17:10

Hosted by David Fauchier, Co-founder, Decusis Capital
Richard Muirhead, Founding Partner, Fabric Ventures
Meltem Demirors, Chief Strategy Officer, CoinShares
Travis Scher, Vice President, Investments, DCG
Charlie Noyes, Principal, Pantera Capital
16:10 – 17:10

ICO Market Review
Keynote: Arthur Hayes, CEO, BitMEX
17:10 – 17:30

Keynote: Arthur Hayes, CEO, BitMEX
17:10 – 17:30

Day 2: RESEARCH
Day 2: RESEARCH
Opening and Welcome
Anita Schjøll Brede, CEO and Founder, Iris.AI
10:30 – 10:40

Anita Schjøll Brede, CEO and Founder, Iris.AI
10:30 – 10:40

How AI, Blockchain and We can Change Scientific Publishing
Anita Schjøll Brede, CEO and Founder, Iris.AI
10:40 – 11:00

There are a number of problems in the world of science today hampering global progress. In a highly lucrative oligopolistic industry with terrible incentive misalignments, a radical change is needed. The only way to change this is with a grassroots movement – of researchers and scientists, librarians, scientific societies, R&D departments, universities, students, and innovators – coming together. We need to forge an alternative to powerful existing intermediaries, create new incentive structures, build commonly owned tools to validate all research and build a common Validated Repository of human knowledge. A combination of blockchain and artificial intelligence provides the technology framework, but as with all research, the scientist herself needs to be in the center.

Anita Schjøll Brede, CEO and Founder, Iris.AI
10:40 – 11:00

There are a number of problems in the world of science today hampering global progress. In a highly lucrative oligopolistic industry with terrible incentive misalignments, a radical change is needed. The only way to change this is with a grassroots movement – of researchers and scientists, librarians, scientific societies, R&D departments, universities, students, and innovators – coming together. We need to forge an alternative to powerful existing intermediaries, create new incentive structures, build commonly owned tools to validate all research and build a common Validated Repository of human knowledge. A combination of blockchain and artificial intelligence provides the technology framework, but as with all research, the scientist herself needs to be in the center.

It Speaks – How to Manage Biased Artificial Intelligence Data Sets
Guy Gadney, Lisa Moretti, Charisma AI
11:00 – 11:20

Data can be seen as the food of artificial intelligence, but are we feeding it junk? This session launches a new research paper with suggestions on how to address bias in data sets and is a must for any business or organisation implementing AI. It highlights sociotechnical blindness as an issue in the tech sector in the research sponsored by King’s College London, the Canadian games industry innovation programme, ReFig.ca, and supported by Charisma.ai.

Guy Gadney, Lisa Moretti, Charisma AI
11:00 – 11:20

Data can be seen as the food of artificial intelligence, but are we feeding it junk? This session launches a new research paper with suggestions on how to address bias in data sets and is a must for any business or organisation implementing AI. It highlights sociotechnical blindness as an issue in the tech sector in the research sponsored by King’s College London, the Canadian games industry innovation programme, ReFig.ca, and supported by Charisma.ai.

A USB Port for the Body: Applying AI to the Nervous System
Emil Hewage, CBAS
11:20 – 11:40

Much like DNA, The Nervous System is as much of a problem of Big Data as it is biology. The Nervous system sends data to our organs and limbs constantly, hence there lies potential in its malleability. If we can apply machine learning to understand what these signals mean and develop interventions to treat chronic conditions that result as a fault of the nervous system, we have the potential to revolutionise medicine and change millions of lives. Cambridge Bio-Augmentation Systems (CBAS) will discuss their current work on the largest nervous system dataset in the world, what insights they have gained, and the future of medicine and AI.

Emil Hewage, CBAS
11:20 – 11:40

Much like DNA, The Nervous System is as much of a problem of Big Data as it is biology. The Nervous system sends data to our organs and limbs constantly, hence there lies potential in its malleability. If we can apply machine learning to understand what these signals mean and develop interventions to treat chronic conditions that result as a fault of the nervous system, we have the potential to revolutionise medicine and change millions of lives. Cambridge Bio-Augmentation Systems (CBAS) will discuss their current work on the largest nervous system dataset in the world, what insights they have gained, and the future of medicine and AI.

The Science Behind the World's First AI Platform for Decision-Making
James Hensman, Haitham Bou Ammar, Enrique Muñoz de Coté, PROWLER.io
11:40 – 12:20

James Hensman, Haitham Bou Ammar, Enrique Muñoz de Coté, PROWLER.io
11:40 – 12:20

LUNCH
12:20 – 13:20

12:20 – 13:20

The cloudUPDRS app: A medical device for the clinical assessment of Parkinson’s Disease
Cosmin Stamate, Birkbeck University
13:20 – 13:40

Parkinson’s Disease is a neurological condition distinguished by characteristic motor symptoms including tremor and slowness of movement. To enable the frequent assessment of PD patients, this paper introduces the cloudUPDRS app, a Class I medical device that is an active transient non-invasive instrument, certified by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in the UK. The app follows closely Part III of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale which is the most commonly used protocol in the clinical study of PD; can be used by patients and their carers at home or in the community unsupervised; and, requires the user to perform a sequence of iterated movements which are recorded by the phone sensors. The cloudUPDRS system addresses two key challenges towards meeting essential consistency and efficiency requirements, namely: (i) How to ensure high-quality data collection especially considering the unsupervised nature of the test, in particular, how to achieve firm user adherence to the prescribed movements; and (ii) How to reduce test duration from approximately 25 min typically required by an experienced patient, to below 4 min, a threshold identified as critical to obtain significant improvements in clinical compliance. To address the former, we combine a bespoke design of the user experience tailored so as to constrain context, with a deep learning approach based on Recurrent Convolutional Neural Networks, to identify failures to follow the movement protocol. We address the latter by developing a machine learning approach to personalize assessments by selecting those elements of the test that most closely match individual symptom profiles and thus offer the highest inferential power, hence closely estimating the patient’s overall score.

Cosmin Stamate, Birkbeck University
13:20 – 13:40

Parkinson’s Disease is a neurological condition distinguished by characteristic motor symptoms including tremor and slowness of movement. To enable the frequent assessment of PD patients, this paper introduces the cloudUPDRS app, a Class I medical device that is an active transient non-invasive instrument, certified by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in the UK. The app follows closely Part III of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale which is the most commonly used protocol in the clinical study of PD; can be used by patients and their carers at home or in the community unsupervised; and, requires the user to perform a sequence of iterated movements which are recorded by the phone sensors. The cloudUPDRS system addresses two key challenges towards meeting essential consistency and efficiency requirements, namely: (i) How to ensure high-quality data collection especially considering the unsupervised nature of the test, in particular, how to achieve firm user adherence to the prescribed movements; and (ii) How to reduce test duration from approximately 25 min typically required by an experienced patient, to below 4 min, a threshold identified as critical to obtain significant improvements in clinical compliance. To address the former, we combine a bespoke design of the user experience tailored so as to constrain context, with a deep learning approach based on Recurrent Convolutional Neural Networks, to identify failures to follow the movement protocol. We address the latter by developing a machine learning approach to personalize assessments by selecting those elements of the test that most closely match individual symptom profiles and thus offer the highest inferential power, hence closely estimating the patient’s overall score.

Paidi Creed – BenevolentAI

13:40 – 14:00


13:40 – 14:00

Andreas Theodorou – Bath University

14:00 – 14:20


14:00 – 14:20

ParticleMDI: Inferring Group Structure for Multiple Datasets with Applications in Genomics
Nathan Cunningham, University of Warwick
14:20 – 14:40

In the forthcoming era of genomic medicine high-throughput data such as gene expression and DNA methylation will be routinely measured for large numbers of patients and used as an input in deciding their clinical care. These data sources provide distinct, often complementary information on a person’s genetic makeup. A key statistical challenge in analysing these data lies in discovering the means of combining these disparate data sources into a single, cohesive analysis. Such analyses will aid in understanding how genetic variations translate into the type of variations we can see or measure, such as one’s blood pressure. In this talk I present particleMDI, an algorithm for performing unsupervised cluster analysis to uncover groups of patients with shared risk profiles on the basis of these genetic data.

Nathan Cunningham, University of Warwick
14:20 – 14:40

In the forthcoming era of genomic medicine high-throughput data such as gene expression and DNA methylation will be routinely measured for large numbers of patients and used as an input in deciding their clinical care. These data sources provide distinct, often complementary information on a person’s genetic makeup. A key statistical challenge in analysing these data lies in discovering the means of combining these disparate data sources into a single, cohesive analysis. Such analyses will aid in understanding how genetic variations translate into the type of variations we can see or measure, such as one’s blood pressure. In this talk I present particleMDI, an algorithm for performing unsupervised cluster analysis to uncover groups of patients with shared risk profiles on the basis of these genetic data.

Machine Learning and User Profiling in the Fashion Domain
Jessica Rosati, Dressipi
14:40 – 15:00

AI and machine learning have been widely applied in user profiling and recommender systems in an attempt to extract patterns in user behaviour, but many challenges must still be addressed in the fashion domain. Fashion retailers must raise fidelity in end-users by providing them with garments that satisfy objective constraints on body shape or colour and are as close as possible to their preferences, which must be elicited and are subject to trends and unexpected personal factors. In this talk I will present the main challenges and opportunities of the fashion domain and discuss approaches to address them. The main topic is the definition of a recommender system that combines multiple sources of information and is trained to suggest to the end-users a captivating list of recommendations, i.e., A list that strikes a balance between accuracy, diversity and novelty.

Jessica Rosati, Dressipi
14:40 – 15:00

AI and machine learning have been widely applied in user profiling and recommender systems in an attempt to extract patterns in user behaviour, but many challenges must still be addressed in the fashion domain. Fashion retailers must raise fidelity in end-users by providing them with garments that satisfy objective constraints on body shape or colour and are as close as possible to their preferences, which must be elicited and are subject to trends and unexpected personal factors. In this talk I will present the main challenges and opportunities of the fashion domain and discuss approaches to address them. The main topic is the definition of a recommender system that combines multiple sources of information and is trained to suggest to the end-users a captivating list of recommendations, i.e., A list that strikes a balance between accuracy, diversity and novelty.

Break
15:00 – 15:20

15:00 – 15:20

Game-Based Assessment for Big Players: How Science, Game Technology and Artificial Intelligence Merge to Identify Top Entrepreneurs.
Lara Montefiori, ArcticShores
15:20 – 15:40

Science-powered game-based assessments have become increasingly popular and diffused in high-volume workplace selection, and sophisticated analysis techniques are now fostering their use with specific groups such as entrepreneurs. This talk will offer an overview of how science has informed a new wave of psychological measures delivered through game technology, and how artificial intelligence has enabled the assessment of traditionally hard-to-measure individuals.

Lara Montefiori, ArcticShores
15:20 – 15:40

Science-powered game-based assessments have become increasingly popular and diffused in high-volume workplace selection, and sophisticated analysis techniques are now fostering their use with specific groups such as entrepreneurs. This talk will offer an overview of how science has informed a new wave of psychological measures delivered through game technology, and how artificial intelligence has enabled the assessment of traditionally hard-to-measure individuals.

Learning to Play: The Multi-Agent Reinforcement Learning in Malmö (MARLÖ) Competition
Raluca Gaina, Queen Mary
15:40 – 16:00

This talk will highlight the reasons behind using games as a way to advance the state of the art of Artificial Intelligence and, particularly, how this can be achieved via competitions. One of the main platforms for research in this area is the Malmo Framework, which proposes a benchmark for users to create and train bots that try to solve a most varied set of tasks, all based in the world of Minecraft. This talk will showcase a new competition (MARLO), which is being organized around the Malmo Framework by a consortium formed by Queen Mary University of London, Microsoft Research and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. MARLO proposes the design and implementation of Reinforcement Learning agents able to play multiple games in a general way, within a multi-agent setting, thus competing or cooperating with other players to achieve varied goals.

Raluca Gaina, Queen Mary
15:40 – 16:00

This talk will highlight the reasons behind using games as a way to advance the state of the art of Artificial Intelligence and, particularly, how this can be achieved via competitions. One of the main platforms for research in this area is the Malmo Framework, which proposes a benchmark for users to create and train bots that try to solve a most varied set of tasks, all based in the world of Minecraft. This talk will showcase a new competition (MARLO), which is being organized around the Malmo Framework by a consortium formed by Queen Mary University of London, Microsoft Research and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. MARLO proposes the design and implementation of Reinforcement Learning agents able to play multiple games in a general way, within a multi-agent setting, thus competing or cooperating with other players to achieve varied goals.

No Datascience – Data Science?!
Christian Steinrueken, Cambridge University
16:00 – 16:20

Christian Steinrueken, Cambridge University
16:00 – 16:20

Day 2: IMPACT
Day 2: CUTTING EDGE
Day 2: ETHICS
Day 2: LAB TO LIVE
Day 2: BLOCKCHAIN
Day 2: RESEARCH